Mayo Clinic Neurologist Explains Probable Cause of Multiple Sclerosis

In this video from the Mayo Clinic, neurologist Dr. Dean Wingerchuk explains that multiple sclerosis is a fairly common disease that affects around 400,000 people in the United States. MS tend to strike in early adulthood, with many patients first beginning to experience symptoms of the disease in their 20s and 30s.

MORE: Five things to know about the new MS treatment Ocrevus.

Dr. Wingerchuk explains that MS doesn’t often present any outward symptoms so others may not realize a patient has the disease. Although there is no known cause for MS, scientists think that it’s a combination of genetics and environmental triggers such as viruses that spark the onset of the disease.

MORE: Explaining 35 of the most commonly used terms in MS.

Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

6 comments

    • b obrien says:

      in july it will be 9 years on tysabri. did betaseron for 12 and a half yrs,switched when had lesions on brain,opt.nerve AND spinal cord. have had 2 serious bladder infections, and no longer walk, but otherwise quite stable. `

    • Robby Teer says:

      That’s AWESOME Claire! I’m having my 50th infusion of Tysabri this Wednesday! January 2014 was my last relapse, after only being diagnosed in September 2013!

    • Sam says:

      Same here mate, been on the sauce for 3 years now and not one relapse!! Still doing my job no problem at all. Keep well Claire x

  1. Linda La Rowe says:

    I have had MS 34 years and have been in SPMS for 14 of those years. I got some help from Dr. Raymond Damadian and Dr. Scott Rosa 5 years ago even though in SPMS 9 years at the time. These doctors feel MS is related to head and/or neck trauma causing the blockage of CSF flow through the cervical spine. This creates the backup of CSF in the ventricles in the brain where it is produced. This leads to the leakage of CSF from the ventricles in the brain, not to mention an increase of CSF pressure in the brain (twice the normal level) in the upright position. This is able to be visualized with software and hardware developed by Dr. Damadian (original inventor of the MRI) for use in the Stand Up MRI (Upright multipositional) MRI also developed at Fonar. With this new technology, CSF is illuminated making it possible to measure the CSF pressure in the brain, see the leakage as it occurs, see blockage points, currents, and back jets in the CSF flow. It is also possible to see the pooling of CSF in the brain, previously thought to be brain atrophy. One cause to the reduction of blood flow in the brain in patients with MS, which can be seen in other MRI scanners (Zamboni, CCSVI), is the increased pressure inside the brain caused by blocked CSF flow. Before Dr. Damadian did his CSF flow studies (in an Upright MRI), it wasn’t known that CSF pressure increased in patients with MS in the upright position…because no other manufacturer has the ability to scan upright in the position of gravity, not to mention, watch the blockage and leakage of CSF and witness the flow to the lesions in the brain. You see, I did see this when I joined an MS study with Dr. Damadian and Dr. Rosa. My scans showed scoliosis in my cervical spine. My atlas disc was diagonal, and C2 was rotated. I had 4 blockage points in my CSF flow and leakage of CSF from all 4 ventricles in my brain…and the leakage went to directly to my lesions. This is where Dr. Rosa comes into play. Noninvasively, he performed an image guided atlas orthogonal alignment on my cervical spine. It opened my CSF flow, and started the improvements I indicated before…including a return of my peripheral vision (gone for 4 years) , I no longer got kaleidoscope vision when I even slightly turned my head (I could drive again), and after about a year, I got feeling back in my abdomen (which had been numb for over a dozen years) solving chronic bladder infections and constipation. It has been over four years since I had a bladder infection and I used to get at least one a quarter. These improvements have no regressed since regained. Dr. Damadian explained, when you open the CSF flow, you stop the CSF leakage, when you stop the leakage, you stop the progression of the disease. When you stop the progression of the disease, your body tries to heal itself. I think that is what I have experienced. My challenge to researchers is to look into this and take it further. How do you get rid of the pools of CSF in the brain? How do you keep the cervical spine in alignment, and what do you do for patients who need more permanent alignment? How do you motivate doctors at MS centers to use this technology to be able to see these events and take advantage of this science? That’s my challenge…or prove me wrong.

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