4 Ways to Help Multiple Sclerosis Patients Stay Mobile

Many of the symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis — dizziness, spasticity, pain, numbness, and fatigue — can manifest into mobility issues. However, according to National MS Society, there are ways to manage these mobility issues so that a person living with MS can continue being active and getting the most out of life.

Correct Footwear
Wearing the right footwear is an important part of managing mobility issues, particularly impaired balance or foot drop. Invest in good, sturdy shoes that support your feet and give plenty of cushioning. Stilettos and sling backs, or shoes that don’t support the back of the heel are out. If you have problems with fine motor movement in your hands, you may find velcro fastenings more preferable to laces.

Vehicle Modifications
Vehicles can be adapted to make driving easier, thus allowing patients to retain independence. However, in some cases, a specially adapted car or minivan may be preferable if you need space for a wheelchair. Your occupational therapist should be able to suggest modifications that can be made to your vehicle to improve your mobility.

MORE: Could muscle twitches be a symptoms of MS?

Mobility Aids
Mobility aids can greatly enhance your independence, allowing you to enjoy trips out while conserving energy and not worrying about falling or tripping. Scooters and wheelchairs can open up a whole new world — there are many different sports that you can play that have been adapted to be scooter- and wheelchair-friendly.

Service Dogs
Service dogs can help with many aspects of living with multiple sclerosis, including mobility. They can be trained to support you as you step up or down and can even pull wheelchairs. They can also help you conserve energy by fetching items, opening and closing doors, turning lights on and off, as well as giving you a reason to get outside for some fresh air and exercise.

MORE: Four things to consider before getting a service dog.

Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

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2 comments

  1. carol says:

    footware–consider bowling shoes with smoother soles–good instead of expensive toe glides. Ive used bowling shoes for @4 years with geat success. dexter makes some with velcro. google for options.

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