Important Things to Remember If You Have MS

If you or a loved one is living with multiple sclerosis (MS), it’s important to remember that you can always try to make your situation better.

If your doctor says something like “there’s no other option” or “we have nothing more to offer you,” find another doctor. Doctors are humans, too, and they make mistakes and have differing opinions. You need to find a doctor that’s as enthusiastic as you are to maintain your quality of life and to help manage your symptoms. If you’re not satisfied with your current doctor, call the National MS Society. They can recommend both a new doctor and steer you towards any resources that exist in your area.

MOREWhy the doctor doesn’t always know best

Most human beings are fiercely independent, even more so if they aren’t well. We base our self-confidence and self-esteem on our independence and find it incredibly difficult if or when we lose it. MS patients see their bodies changing and sometimes view their inability to control everything as a loss of independence, but that doesn’t have to be the case. Remember that just because you can’t do things the same way you used to or as fast as you once did doesn’t mean you can’t do them at all. There are resources like assistive technology, rehabilitation professionals and complex rehabilitation technology (CRT) that can aid you in different ways.

These changes and perceived loss of control and independence can often lead to depression. Know the signs so you can seek help if you feel like you may be heading down that path.

MORE: Tips for managing depression when you have MS

Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

One comment

  1. Keiko Palmero says:

    Thank you for this article. I was diagnosed in Feb 2017 and since then I’ve been reading and researching about this disease. The more I read the more I get confused! I finally contacted a MS Clinic located in the neighboring state and had to call me current neurologist’s office For copies of my medical records and I felt guilty! Because this doctor actually found my MS and got me help with my medication. But that’s all he’s done! I’d ask questions and he would go around in circles and when I leave his office I’d feel even more confused! So thanks my guilt for looking for help else where has been relieved!

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