#WorldStatisticsDay – Multiple Sclerosis Numbers

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According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America:

  • An estimated 2,500,000 people in the world have multiple sclerosis;
  • 350,000 to 500,000 people in the U.S. who have been diagnosed with MS;
  • 200 people are diagnosed with MS every week;
  • Most people are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50 (although MS can occur in young children and significantly older adults too);
  • Research suggests that Women are roughly two to three times more likely to develop MS versus men;
  • Individuals growing up in regions closer to the equator have a lower incidence of MS. The rate of MS increases as distance from the equator increases (this may be related to diet, exposure to sunlight, and/or other lifestyle traits);
  • In the US alone:
    • The average person has about one in 750 (0.1%) chance of developing MS;
    • When it comes to family:
      • For first-degree relatives of a person with MS, such as children, siblings or non-identical twins, the risk rises to approximately 2.5-5% (this risk may be potentially higher in families that have several family members with the disease);
      • The identical twin of someone with MS (who shares all the same genes) has a 25% chance of developing the disease.

Questions to Ask Your Doctor If You’re Newly Diagnosed

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We consulted some of our community contributors at MS News Today and came up with 12 questions people should consider asking their doctors after an MS diagnosis.

Check it out by clicking here.

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