Zoloft (sertraline) is used to treat depression and certain types of anxiety. Because depression is common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), it is often prescribed to those who have the disease.

Zoloft is an antidepressant from the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) group. It positively affects chemicals that exist in the brain and that may be unbalanced in people with depression, anxiety, or other similar diseases.

shutterstock_303540788Zoloft comes as a tablet or a liquid to be taken by mouth once daily, and should be taken at the same time every day. It may take a few weeks or longer before the full benefit of Zoloft is noticed.

Some of the common side effects of Zoloft may include drowsiness, dizziness, tiredness, gastric disorders, dry mouth, changes in appetite or weight, sleeping disorders, decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm.

This medicine has a black box warning (information that appears on a prescription drug’s label and is designed to call attention to serious or life-threatening risks) regarding an increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in people with major depression and other psychiatric disorders, especially during the first months of treatment or following changes in dosage.

Generic versions of Zoloft have been approved by the FDA, but are not yet commercially available due to patents or exclusivity.

Read the latest news about depression in multiple sclerosis here.

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