This topic contains 15 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Ed Tobias 7 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #11191
     Jonathan White 
    Participant

    So I have just been bought by my wonderful mother a medium size mobility scooter, a Kymco Agilty.  I have had a boot scooter for years but gone is the constant thought of will my battery run out… its down as doing 25 mile on a single charge. Ok so I have only had it a week and I may come back on the battery life, but I truly love it..there is a niggle,  I think its too big to get into the family car (no way do I want a van), but I can  live with that if it (which it did at the weekend) take me so the local town some 2 miles away for a coffee with ease and allows me to go with the family to walk the dog without the feeling of guilt that my wife has to assemble the boot scooter. As it has decent suspension it also goes over rough terrain with ease, following my daughter on her bike over parkland.

    I should say that I am also lucky enough to have a electric roller garage door so getting into it is a breeze.

    The only bad point that I can currently think of is that my daughter thinks that I want to live in the local cop-op shop some mile and a half away as any excuse and I offer to go!

    Apparently my wife thinks that I have been given a new lease of life and colour in my cheeks.

    Any other stories ?

  • #11197
     Ed Tobias 
    Keymaster

    I have two scooters. My larger scooter is a Pride Go-Go. It breaks into four parts, the heaviest of which is about 40 lbs. I used to be able to break it apart and put it into the back of my SUV, but I can’t do it anymore. So, I now have a motorized lift on the back of the SUV to carry it. I just drive onto it, raise it up and off we go.

    My smaller scooter is a TravelScoot. It only weighs 35 lbs TOTAL. It also folds up like a baby stroller and can fit in the trunk of a car. It’s lithium-ion battery goes forever and I’ve taken the TravelScoot with me on trains, boats and planes, and through 15 or 16 countries.

    Buying a scooter, years ago, was one of the best things I’ve ever done.

    Ed

     

  • #11371
     aliciahelfan 
    Participant

    I have just replaced my wheel chair with mobility scooter. My experience after having it is really great.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by  aliciahelfan.
  • #11515
     Cyndi B 
    Participant

    I bought a Luggie (Free Rider) scooter about a year ago.  I both love and hate it.  I love the independence it gives me when just zipping around a store, visiting a museum, going to a movie, or managing long (and short) distances in airports.  It also makes me a more pleasant companion — while my husband never objected to pushing me in a wheelchair from spot to spot — I feel much better about myself in not being so dependent.  The battery life on the scooter  is great, the turns sharp and nimble, and the scooter being very narrow I can maneuver through most any restaurant.  What I hate (or, more accurately, dislike) about the scooter is when travelling I become more dependent on it and get less independent exercise.  If taking an extended vacation I find myself in worse shape upon returning home because I have used the scooter so much.  If I try to see the silver lining in this….I guess it just means I had a good vacation and got to go do and see some fun things.   I have, however, as a result purchased a tube type carrier in which I can fit a lightweight foldable walker that I plan to take on my next trip so I can incorporate more independent exercise even if it is just walking up and down a hotel hallway.  Bottom line — I would encourage you to find a scooter that works for you — the benefits far out weigh any negatives.

  • #11639
     Jacqueline 
    Participant

    This is something I have been putting off, same as when first using a stick, followed by my rollator…but this topic is making me see sense…Well not anymore, especially when I am hearing-reading that ” buying a mobility scooter was the best thing I  ever done, it has given me my life back, ) ok, well maybe not quite…”

    These last couple of days I have visited a couple of store, yesterday was a 170 mile return journey, a nightmare travelling journey but, I shop tested the one I had in mind, thankfully I never made the expensive mistake in just ordering it, it wasn’t suitable for me but…for maybe anyone else, the brand and make was Drive Medical – Travelite auto folding ( purple )…I do have two others in mind which are easily fold-able by remote or hand… I will post again once I make up my mind which one of the two after test riding a second time but, at a nearer  mobility showroom…I shall be buying-ordering one this week…

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by  Jacqueline.
    • #11641
       Ed Tobias 
      Keymaster

      Hi Jacqueline,

      I suggest that you check the TravelScoot that I use. It’s made in the U.K. but, unfortunately, it’s only available on-line at http://www.travelscoot.com. As I’ve written, it’s very light and folds up like a baby stroller. I’m not a salesman for them – no connection at all – but my TravelScoot and I have traveled all over the world, even through the ruins of Ephasis, Turkey, and it’s worked like a champ.

      Ed

       

  • #11642
     Jacqueline 
    Participant

    Ed, thank you so much for your suggestions, I did look yours up from the start, in-fact that was what edged me on to now think seriously about getting myself a mobility scooter…I am not a traveller now, but for ease getting one into the back of the car, I am leading towards a travel scooter that closes to a suitcase on wheels, without the need for taking 4 or 5 pieces apart only to put them together again…Isn’t technology now marvellous, just a touch of a button and one self closes…I do need one with arm rests for security, and one that will get me both uphill and downhill, as this is where I now live, down in the valley..

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by  Jacqueline.
  • #11648
     Cyndi B 
    Participant

    Jacqueline (and others considering a mobility scooter),  Just wanted to add one additional consideration you may want to factor in when assessing scooters: Do you have limitations or restrictions on leg position on a scooter?  Specifically, can you manage a pedal/bar on which to place and hold your feet…or…do you need or prefer a larger flatter surface.  I cannot use the single pedal/bar variety for extended periods and therefore prefer a scooter with a “floor board” of sorts.  Again, this is a personal “what works best for you” decision but I offer it up for your consideration in selecting a scooter.  I have no doubt you will find one that works best for you and that you will embrace and love the freedom.  Good luck!

    • #11655
       Ed Tobias 
      Keymaster

      Good point, Cyndi. Thanks for mentioning it.

      Ed

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by  Ed Tobias.
  • #11649
     Jacqueline 
    Participant

    Cyndi…

    …thank you, any suggestions are helpful…one thing I do know is that, I need to stretch my legs out rather than to have them hunched up…I am also aware some mobility scooters have a carpeting affect ” non-slip ” which prevents ones feet from slipping…I plan today to go test ride the two I have in mind, but more local this time…One is a brand new model not even on their websites yet..

  • #11664
     Ken Biron 
    Participant

    Having had a scooter for the past 7 or 8 years has taught me a few things.  No one should just “gift” a scooter to people with mobility issues or even seniors who need one as they just lost their license due to age.  That said, if the person to receive goes to an accredited referral source such as an occupational therapist first, that specialist will work with the patient to instruct the safe operation of a device that is “fitted” to the person.  It is dangerous to give a device to someone with no proper instruction on its use in the wild.  You may save money on what is better and safer for the recipient of your gift.    It is much different than a conventional vehicle and many can go quite a distance from home.  For one thing, if it is limited by design to under 10kph (~6.4mph) the rider is a pedestrian.  There are 2 faster designs as well, they have different local rules the specialist the patient sees will explain.  Having accredited instruction will help reduce accidents and increase the enjoyment of the device for the recipient and if a loved contact of yours, ease your fear when the person is out and about enjoying their gift of freedom.

    • #11666
       Debi Wilson 
      Member

      Sounds like you have some adventures ahead Jackie! Sounds fun!

  • #11665
     Debi Wilson 
    Member

    Good advice and information, Ken! Thank-you for posting!

  • #11733
     Jacqueline 
    Participant

    Well after seeing then replying to this topics subject matter…one I had always pushed from my mind that I didn’t want to see myself on one ( a mobility scooter ) I have now opened my eyes ad given in and not only bought one but brought it home the same day, and yesterday, the day after, we put in the the car, took the dog, and we drove to the promenade – esplanade, and went along the path overlooking and viewing the sea, where it felt so good just getting the fresh airs sea breeze on my face…thankfully the whole length had bench seatings where one can sit and view the sea, as I did taking it all in, just stunning…So many times we drove along its high wall, and for the first time I was seeing for myself what was up there..

    Well of course it took a few drives out to a couple of mobility scooter stores, where I had to ride test just to get some confidence….then the few days of mulling it over “of which if any will I purchase, with knowing I cant get this wrong.” In the end I chose a PRIDE QUEST foldable travel scooter…partly I wanted a scooter that one didn’t need to take apart in five pieces, I wanted a fold-up, whether by hand or would have preferred automatically…The reasons I decided on this scooter was ( apart from eye appeal, ) the fact it had a non slip floor covering, and room to spread my legs rather than being hunched up to my chest… the only negative for me is that it lacked folding arm rests, and maybe the back rest wasn’t so comfortable leather as some of the others I tested…As they say, it does what it says on the tin, it fills my needs for this moment in time…

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by  Jacqueline.
  • #14272
     Steven Whitson 
    Blocked

    I have been through two electric wheelchairs and I still have my manual wheelchair but no scooter yet I would love a three wheeler trike motorcycle for my scooter but i guess I would be happy with a electric scooter to get around town on.I road a two wheel motorcycle for years until about 8 or 9 years ago, it just got to heavy to back out of my garage.

    • #14293
       Ed Tobias 
      Keymaster

      I think you’ll like a scooter, Steven. But, compared to your bike the scooter is going to seem realllllly s-l-o-w.

      BTW, I wrote a column a little over a year ago about people with MS who still ride. You might like it.

      Ed

      ‘Easy Rider’ Dreams? Say Yes to the Motorcycle

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