Keppra (levetiracetam) is an anti-epileptic drug that also is used to help improve spasticity and spasms in people with multiple sclerosis.

Levetiracetam works by decreasing abnormal excitement in the brain, although its precise mechanism of action is unknown.

Levetiracetam treatment

Levetiracetam is to be taken orally, usually twice a day (except for the long-acting formulation, which is taken once daily), with or without food. It might help control the spasticity and spasms, but will not cure it. Levetiracetam should not be stopped when symptoms are relieved, or withdrawal symptoms such as changes in behavior or mood are experienced.

Common side effects are similar to those seen with gabapentin, including dizziness, drowsiness, tiredness, weakness, aggressiveness or irritability, loss of appetite, stuffy nose or infection.

generic version of Keppra has been approved by the FDA, but may not be available due to patent issues or exclusivity of uses.

Spasticity treatment may vary from time to time, depending on the regularity of the symptoms and on what triggers the spasticity. The dose of medication will be increased gradually until a full benefit is evident, and reduced if side effects occur. Also, the moment of the intake of the medication also may be adjusted according to the activity. For example, taking anti-spasticity medication before sexual activity may prevent painful spasms during orgasm.

 

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