Neurontin (gabapentin) is an anti-epileptic drug but it is also used to help multiple sclerosis patients control pain caused by MS lesions and spasticity. Gabapentin affects chemicals and nerves that cause seizures and some types of pain.

Neurontin is to be taken orally, usually three times a day, with or without food. It might help control the condition but will not cure it. Neurontin should not be stopped when symptoms are relieved or the patient may experience withdrawal symptoms such as anxiety, sleeping disorders, nausea, pain, and sweating.

Common neurontin side effects may include dizziness, drowsiness, or headache.

A generic version of Neurontin has been approved by the FDA, but may not be available due to patent issues or exclusivity for uses.

Pain can have a significant negative impact on the quality of life of people with MS. A combination of medicine and positive lifestyle changes such as exercising and staying active, massages, chiropractic treatments, hydrotherapy, and acupuncture may improve the patient’s the quality of life.

Regular analgesics are typically not enough to ease pain from nerve damage in the central nervous system, so drugs that treat seizures (phenytoin, gabapentin, carbamazepine) and antidepressants (amitriptyline, nortriptyline) and some benzodiazepines (clonazepam) are commonly first choices for pain management in MS.

Read the latest news on pain management and multiple sclerosis.

Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.