When people with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience bladder dysfunction such as urinary frequency and incontinence, doctors may prescribe a medication such as Tofranil (imipramine) to treat or manage the problem.

Tofranil is a tricyclic antidepressant that is more commonly used to treat depression, but people with MS may find it helpful to treat annoying bladder symptoms. Occasionally it may also be used for neurologic pain in MS patients.

For urinary incontinence, Tofranil is usually taken one hour before bedtime, starting with a 25 mg tablet that may be increased to a maximum of 150 mg (in 25 mg increments).

Common side effects may include a tingly feeling, weakness, lack of coordination, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, vision changes, ringing in the ears, swelling in the breasts in men or women, and decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm.

Tofranil has a black box warning (information on a prescription drug’s label that’s designed to call attention to serious or life-threatening risks) concerning an increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, teenagers, and young adults with major depressive and other psychiatric disorders, especially during the first months of therapy or following dosage changes.

Read the latest news here about bladder dysfunction and multiple sclerosis.

Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.