An Anniversary of Sorts: 7 Years Since My Diagnosis

An Anniversary of Sorts: 7 Years Since My Diagnosis

Jennifer Silver Linings
Anniversaries often invoke reflection about the beginning, the journey, and where we now find ourselves. With luck, lessons will have been learned from the invariably good and bad experiences that couple any passage of time.

In November 2010, I sat, eyes firmly affixed, as my neurologist read my MRI results. His best guess was that I had multiple sclerosis, and as he rattled off the myriad of tests that would later confirm this diagnosis, my head began to spin. My only reference to multiple sclerosis had been dramatizations on television, and as I walked out to my waiting husband, I began to cry.

I am not entirely sure what I expected, as that summer I was often unable to get out of bed or stay awake past 6 or 7 p.m. I repeatedly walked into walls, stumbled while walking, and ultimately fell backward in the bathtub, herniating four of my lumbar. October ended with a crescendo, when I awoke one morning unable to move my right side, speak clearly, or walk unassisted, and a painful numbness dominated my extremities.

Leaving my neurologist’s office I knew life would never be the same; what a profound understatement. How do you quantify seven years of disease progression? How do you adequately summarize the physical and emotional shift that changed forever?

The girl who walked out of that office, while memorable, is no longer recognizable. I still experience my share of fears, tears, pain, and sadness, yet none of these define who I am. While my emotional and physical pendulum has swung wildly, the weighted bob has finally settled at the crux of whom I have become today.

I am hope and faith. I am strength and wisdom. I am purpose and possibility.

I am all of these as a direct result of my diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, so in an odd way, I am grateful for that day so long ago. Much like a rebirth, it rerouted me in a direction I perhaps needed more than wanted, for I cannot imagine choosing to experience all I have endured. However, much like a diamond, the trials and tribulations have eroded the useless exterior, leaving behind exactly whom I was born to be.

I once read a quote saying the two most important days of your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why. While the former is somewhat affixed, the latter has only been realized these last seven years. I believe with all that I am that the origin of our purpose lies in each one of us, and that only through extreme circumstances that demand self-exploration can we find out what it is.

I have come to find my healing through action steps, and everything from volunteering and fundraising to merely taking a shower and getting out of my pajamas qualifies. MS is extremely unpredictable, so I try to be both kind and flexible when choosing which action steps will enhance my day.

One aspect of life I have embraced over all others is not to sweat the small stuff. It is easy to focus on the immateriality in life; I once did. I would like to suggest the etiology to change was my own, but it was not. I changed my entire mindset by virtue of survival; there was no way I could entertain so much frivolity when just trying to navigate the pain and physical challenges MS brought forth. While my disease commanded change, it was up to me to own, and I am a much happier and peaceful individual because of this.

With the passage of time, we find ourselves reflecting: Have we furthered our careers or our bank accounts? Are we the Joneses or at the very least keeping up with them? Do we have our dream house, career, car, etc.?

I read these questions and have to laugh. While there is nothing wrong with any of them, they have certainly not been among mine these past seven years. My litmus has morphed, and as I look back, I close my eyes and take in a deep breath. I have rocked these years like no other.

I have survived and I have thrived.

***

Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

4 comments

  1. Julie R. says:

    I’m so appreciative of this article, thank you for sharing your story. I’m coming up on my one-year anniversary of my diagnosis and have been grappling with the reflection that these commemorations tend to bring. I know one thing for certain- this past year has taught me more about my myself than I think I would have learned in any other situation. I felt more than I knew I had in me to feel. And I’ve definitely learned not to sweat the small stuff. I am amazed at how quickly my perspective changed (although this year felt like a never-ending nightmare), but am humbled by the roller-coaster it took to get here. I hope I can look back in seven years and feel a similar type of growth, peace, and happiness that you have found.

  2. Carole Sachs says:

    I really enjoyed your article. After five years I wrote my journey with MS and it’s pretty similar to yours actually. I was diagnosed in October 2011. Keeping positive and optimistic are key!

  3. Daniel James Geiser says:

    Hello all, my name is Daniel James…… Also really liked reading this . Congratulations, !!!!!!! and thankful for your awesome pick me up!!!!! I was diagnosed a little over a year ago , but after reading your story I now have more hope than ever….. Been really tough on me and my family, but today is a new day, and I’m ready for it…. thanks again, it was a pick me up ….. Daniel James

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *