Andrea Lobo, PhD, science writer —

Andrea Lobo holds a PhD in cell biology/neurosciences from the University of Coimbra-Portugal, where she studied stroke biology. As a research scientist for 19 years, Andrea participated in academic projects in multiple research fields, from stroke, gene regulation, cancer, and rare diseases. She has authored multiple research papers in peer-reviewed journals.

Articles by Andrea Lobo

Briumvi’s permanent J-code will aid reimbursement for MS patients

The recently approved CD20 inhibitor Briumvi (ublituximab-xiiy) has received a permanent insurance reimbursement code that will simplify claims submissions and documentation processes for adults in the U.S. with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis who are prescribed it. Issued by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the…

Aidaptus auto-injector wins Red Dot award for product design

Owen Mumford‘s Aidaptus auto-injector, which lets a wide range of under-the-skin medications to be administered, has won a Red Dot Award in the Product Design 2023 category. Launched in 2021, Aidaptus is a disposable auto-injector whose design fits multiple-sized prefilled glass syringes without changing parts. This could provide…

Cariloop partners with Walgreens to support MS patients, caregivers

Cariloop has teamed up with Walgreens to provide support services at select neurology-specialty pharmacies to people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their caregivers. Through its caregiver platform, Cariloop offers services such as professional counseling and cloud-based tools to help families manage challenges and plan for caregiving-associated activities.

Early treatment with Mavenclad, antibodies eased highly active MS

Early treatment with Mavenclad (cladribine) or monoclonal antibodies is more likely to control symptoms in people with highly active multiple sclerosis (MS), a study in Argentina suggests. Highly active disease usually is considered when frequent relapses occur and there is an increasing burden of brain magnetic resonance imaging…

Quitting smoking or moving to snuff may help slow MS progression

Smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke are both associated with significantly faster disease progression in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), but snuff, a smokeless tobacco product placed behind the upper lip, seems to slow MS progression, a study in Sweden suggests. Findings also linked smoking and secondhand exposure, also…

Drinking coffee and tea may protect against MS, study says

People who drink black and green tea, coffee, and nonalcoholic beer may be significantly less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS), a study in Iran has found. In contrast, consuming carbonated beverages, milk, and natural fruit juices seems to increase the chances of developing the neurodegenerative condition, according to…

Greater MS disability reported in patients with COVID-19 infection

Infection with the virus that causes COVID-19 significantly accelerates neurological disability in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), at least in the first months after infection, a study from Belgium reported. A more severe case of COVID-19, one requiring hospitalization, also significantly associated with a faster worsening of MS…

WHO asked to add 3 MS treatments to its list of ‘essential medicines’

Aiming to promote equitable access to multiple sclerosis (MS) treatments worldwide, an international MS alliance is asking that three disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) be added to the World Health Organization’s (WHO) list of essential medicines. Inclusion on the WHO list is considered an important if “initial” step in assuring that helpful treatments…

Ocrevus can be safe, effective for children with active RRMS: Study

Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) is a safe and effective treatment for patients under 18 with highly active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a small study from Turkey suggests. Over about 2.5 years of the treatment, these pediatric patients experienced no relapses or MRI activity, and their disability level also improved, indicating…

Key Myelin Protein Shows Promise as Biomarker for MS

The tiny sacs of cellular content that are released by oligodendrocytes — the myelin-producing cells of the brain and spinal cord — may be good biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, a new study has found. The research showed that levels of myelin basic…

Quanterix Poised to Launch Test That Monitors NfL Levels

Quanterix Corporation‘s laboratory test designed to measure blood levels of neurofilament light chain (NfL) has been validated by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA), an arm of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that regulates laboratory testing. The company now is planning to launch its laboratory developed test,…

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