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After My Diagnosis, Daily Affirmations Changed How I Spoke to Myself

After My Diagnosis, Daily Affirmations Changed How I Spoke to Myself
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I am confident.

I am amazing.

I am enough. 

Don’t worry, I’m not getting big-headed. I say these statements to myself every day.

Why? It’s part of a routine I started a few years ago, and it’s safe to say it’s changed my life completely. 

Before, I was an anxious, sad, and unconfident person. It’s true! If I left the house on my own, I’d have panic attacks. I’d also experience these episodes when speaking to someone, especially if I had to call them on the phone. I hated being in a room of people, and I hated having conversations with people I didn’t know (ironic that I became a podcast host, huh?). I was very risk-averse, too. I was never one to take chances. 

My MS diagnosis changed my perspective on life. I realized there were more important things in the world. Compared with my diagnosis, the things I’d worried about, such as leaving the house, felt silly. 

Unfortunately, I was still so fearful of everything. But now, it was all MS-related.

To help change my mindset, I started reading “I am” statements out loud every morning and journaling my thoughts. I didn’t believe the “I am” statements at first. I’d say them out loud and repeat them in my head every single day. For months, nothing changed.  

I’d say, “I am confident.” I wished I could be a confident person. I was sick of being so fearful.

I am amazing.” I didn’t believe that I was at the time. 

I am enough.” Growing up, I never felt like I was good enough. 

I am beautiful.” I believed I was ugly. 

We all go through these phases from time to time; it’s perfectly normal. Although, if I have learned anything, it’s that there is a better way to live. 

I was telling myself, “I can’t do this, I’m not good enough, I’m not clever enough, I’m not pretty enough, I’m not worthy enough.” And it only amplified those feelings.

Having those negative feelings affected my actions. I took fewer risks, I accepted fewer opportunities, and I made fewer friends. 

I was miserable — until I discovered positive statements, sometimes called “affirmations.”

As I mentioned above, every day I would tell myself “I am …” and add a characteristic I wanted to improve upon. 

“I can’t do that” became “I am a confident person who can do anything.” 

When I changed my inner dialogue, guess what happened? 

I unconsciously changed my actions. 

I started a business

I started to share my story. 

I started a podcast, which still feels bizarre to me. 

Changing how I spoke to myself was the key to unlocking a new world full of opportunity. 

Action steps

Try this with me right now. 

  • Grab a piece of paper, or open the Notes app on your phone, and brainstorm the type of person you’d like to be (confident, assertive, brave, beautiful, etc.). Make a list.
  • Write out your own set of “I am” statements. Keep them short and positive. For example, “I am not listening to what other people think” could be strengthened by switching the negative to a positive: “I am in control of what I think of me, and that’s all that matters.”
  • Repeat every morning. To start, put your statements on your bathroom mirror and read them whenever you see them. 

Share your “I am” statements with me in the comments below!

***

Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today or its parent company, BioNews, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

Jessie is the host of the DISabled to ENabled podcast and author of the “ENabled Warriors Symptom Tracker” book. She’s also an illustrator working with MS charities and magazines worldwide. She’s interviewed paralympians, radio DJs, chronic illness bloggers, marathon runners, and more. Jessie, based in the U.K., was diagnosed with MS at 22 years old and was told by a doctor to “go home and Google it” to find out what MS was for herself. Her own experience of being newly diagnosed so young was negative and scary, so she fills the internet with positivity for other anxious MS Googlers to stumble upon.
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Jessie is the host of the DISabled to ENabled podcast and author of the “ENabled Warriors Symptom Tracker” book. She’s also an illustrator working with MS charities and magazines worldwide. She’s interviewed paralympians, radio DJs, chronic illness bloggers, marathon runners, and more. Jessie, based in the U.K., was diagnosed with MS at 22 years old and was told by a doctor to “go home and Google it” to find out what MS was for herself. Her own experience of being newly diagnosed so young was negative and scary, so she fills the internet with positivity for other anxious MS Googlers to stumble upon.

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4 comments

  1. Charles Lumia says:

    I am knowledgeable! I school everyone in bar trivia, well I used to back in the good old days when we went to bars 😀

    • Jessie Ace says:

      Bars? What are they?! Haha! I bet that was brilliant. It’s been so long since I went to a bar! I bet you provided a wealth of Knowledge to everyone around you, Charles! 🙂 #StayENabled, Jessie

  2. Bonni Mower says:

    I was especially drawn to this post. It’s a sign. I never verbalized some of the “I am” affirmations….I never even thought them let aloud say them out loud. But I did connect on one in particular and I am going to try to “wear it” every day going forward. It actually explains a lt about where I am today and even more about where I am NOT today.

    Thanks, great post.

    • Jessie Ace says:

      Thank you so much for your comment Bonni, I’m so glad my article had an impact on you and glad to hear it brought you some clarity. I hope you’re well, #StayENabled, Jessie

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