March has been Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month since it was launched in 2003. The goal is to raise public awareness about MS and to involve more people in the MS community, either through education programs, raising funds for research, or helping out in other ways.

What can you do?

One way is to help more people understand what MS is and to understand how MS affects the daily life activities of people living with the disease. Helping others to better understand MS increases the chances of more fundraising opportunities — this means more money that can be used for research and, hopefully, find a cure for MS.

A simple action is to get social. You can start by sharing inspiring videos to help others understand MS. Social media like Facebook and Twitter are great tools to easily and rapidly spread information. Using various social media tools, you can spread awareness for MS and reach many people.

Associations like the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) invite people to see and share videos on its YouTube channel. The NMSS also invites people to join events to help others better understand the disease. On the NMSS website, you can consider events such as Walk MS, Bike MS, Challenge MS, and others. These fundraisers aim to raise money for MS while having people share the experience with others, both with or without MS. You can become an activist for MS on the NMSS site and help involve federal, state, and local lawmakers in MS awareness campaigns.

Most MS organizations support national campaigns to raise awareness and seek donations. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America (MSAA) recently launched a promotional video that showcased its activities by demonstrating what it does to help people with MS in the community.

You can also follow our Multiple Sclerosis News Today social media pages by following our Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest pages for other ideas and to get updates about MS research, new therapies, and MS Awareness Month.

 

Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.