New Patent Filing for QuadraMune Relates to Potential in Aiding Memory

New Patent Filing for QuadraMune Relates to Potential in Aiding Memory
4.6
(20)

Therapeutics Solutions International has announced filing a new patent covering the memory protective effects of its natural nutritional supplement QuadraMune, as seen in an animal model of memory loss caused by inflammation.

QuadraMune is a nutritional supplement, available in capsule form, made of four ingredients with known anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and immune stimulatory properties. The four are: pterostilbene, which is derived from blueberries; epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), an active ingredient of green tea; sulforaphane, a broccoli-derived compound; and thymoquinone, which is mainly found in black cumin.

This filing follows several others for QuadraMune, including one covering the suppression of immune system pathways, one covering synergistic effects with an anti-diabetes medication for treating lung damage associated with COVID-19, and one covering neuroprotective and brain regenerative activities of one of its ingredients.

QuadraMune is being investigated as a potential way of preventing COVID-19 infections in a clinical trial (NCT04421391) in healthy participants taking place at its California headquarters.

But the company believes the therapy’s anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and memory protective effects may extend its use to diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s.

“The current data is an extension of our ongoing obsession with identifying mechanisms by which QuadraMune works and expanding its potential for other diseases. It is known that conditions such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s Disease are all associated with brain inflammation,” James Veltmeyer, MD, chief medical officer of Therapeutics Solutions, said in the company’s press release.

While some benefits of this supplement are known, researchers at Therapeutics Solution and collaborators are working to understand QuadraMune’s mechanisms of action and to potentially expand its use to additional disorders.

In a recent experiment, researchers investigated the memory-protective effects of QuadraMune in animal models, which experienced a 57% reduction in memory after receiving an inflammatory stimulus.

QuadraMune is reported to have restored memory activity in these animals, and  to have lowered the number of cytokines — proteins that regulate immune system activity — associated with brain inflammation.

These cytokines are involved in neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis. Memory and cognitive loss is an established symptom of the disease, suggesting that QuadraMune may be of some benefit to MS patients.

QuadraMune may also lower inflammation in people with mental health disorders, such as dementia and depression, the company states.

“It has not escaped us that mental health issues such as dementia and depression are associated with inflammatory cytokines,” said Famela Ramos, director of business development and co-inventor on the patent. “We are currently investigating the possibility of utilizing QuadraMune or similar formulations for psychiatric indications.”

Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
Total Posts: 1,053
Patrícia holds her PhD in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases from the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, The Netherlands. She has studied Applied Biology at Universidade do Minho and was a postdoctoral research fellow at Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal. Her work has been focused on molecular genetic traits of infectious agents such as viruses and parasites.
×
Inês holds a PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, where she specialized in blood vessel biology, blood stem cells, and cancer. Before that, she studied Cell and Molecular Biology at Universidade Nova de Lisboa and worked as a research fellow at Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologias and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência. Inês currently works as a Managing Science Editor, striving to deliver the latest scientific advances to patient communities in a clear and accurate manner.
Latest Posts
  • PoNS device
  • QuadraMune patent filing
  • Ocrevus and infection risk
  • tolebrutinib and myelin

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 4.6 / 5. Vote count: 20

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

As you found this post useful...

Follow us on social media!

We are sorry that this post was not useful for you!

Let us improve this post!

Tell us how we can improve this post?