Listen to the Music of Multiple Sclerosis

Listen to the Music of Multiple Sclerosis

MS_Wire_Ed_Tobias
You may not have heard this song, but I bet its lyrics will strike a chord.

I cannot feel my body.
I cannot feel my face.
My legs are pins and needles
and my mind is a disgrace.
I see in double vision,
so there’s more of you to admire.
Got a freaky disposition
and my soul is on fire.

The title of the song is “Mrs. Hypochondriac,” but singer-songwriter Alu’s symptoms are far from imaginary. Alu, (pronounced AY-loo) has MS. As she explains on her website: “Prior to being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, I had a lot of weird symptoms that doctors couldn’t explain. People often accused me of being a hypochondriac. It was a really difficult time.” She calls the song “a story of survival — surviving a brief tumultuous marriage, divorce, and MS diagnosis.”

Alu was diagnosed with MS in 2012. Not long after that she wrote another song with an MS connection, called “Marie.” It ends:

Oh, Marie.
Life is never what it seems.
You can plan and prepare
but please beware:
Life will humble you.
Life will humble you.
This life will humble you.

Alu isn’t the only performer singing about MS. On YouTube, “Irishbear76” takes a more direct approach:

Possibly the most unique song, and certainly the most positive one that I’ve discovered, was written and performed by Kristen King. “Impervious” tells the story of how stem cell therapy changed her life:

Have you put your MS experience to music? I’d love to hear it, if you’re willing to share. Just drop a link in Comments.

Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

5 comments

  1. Daniel K says:

    The real music of MS is the industrial churning beats and buzz of an MRI machine. One cannot lay through that without hearing it as such.

    • Jason Terry says:

      You are so right, Daniel K. I’ve often thought of making an industrial track replicating the sounds of the MRI machine. So dark and heavy sounding.

      • Hello, I’m a professional singer/songwriter/recording artist/voice teacher who was featured in the MS magazine Momentum’s special issue last year about “aging with MS.” I failed to mention in that article that when having an MRI refused a technicians offer of a radio station in the headphones because, from experience, I knew it would be poor quality sound and a lot of static over the music! I chose to go with the banging and clanging of the MRI machine, as I could use the the rhythm and the beats for creative flow of melodies I could conjure in my mind. The MRI sounds were to me, easiest to work with hearing them as Latin beats.
        Time passed quickly. But even more helpful, was that putting the beats to melodies and enjoying it, I was distracted from the body itches and points of pain that would come up and about which I could do nothing.
        I have lived and worked with MS all my adult life, and the past 25 years with the disease has been debilitating. My Dr.and I have speculated that it began 50 yrs ago after a bout with mononucleosis.
        For all those years, I raised four children as a working, single mom, frequently hospitalized until just 3 yrs ago when I was finally diagnosed because the brain scarring had become visible on the MRI pics.
        I spend most of my time these days as a freelance writer. I don’t know if I’ll ever have the energy to produce the book I have in me about my MS journey, but I have been writing articles for publication, hoping to help and to inspire others living with MS.
        If you would consider publishing an article of mine in MS News or another other magazine with which you are involved, I would like very much to hear back from you. Thank you very much.
        Rosemary Conte

        • Ed Tobias says:

          Hi Rosemary,

          Thanks so much for your comments. Although I do use the headphones in an MRI, the beat of the machine usually drowns out whatever’s being pumped into the headset. So, I’ve also found myself “grooving” with the beat. Maybe it’s because I played drums a bit during my high school and college days.

          I’ve asked Ian Win, our Managing Columns Editor, to take a look at your question about publishing something in MS News Today. That kind of decision is above my pay grade.

          Regards,

          Ed

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