The Ogo: A 21st Century Mobility Scooter, but with a Hefty Price Tag

The Ogo: A 21st Century Mobility Scooter, but with a Hefty Price Tag

MS_Wire_Ed_Tobias
About a year ago, I first learned about something called an Ogo. It was just in the development phase then, but it was the neatest thing I’d ever seen for getting around when your legs can’t do the job. You don’t need to use your arms, either. Just bend in the direction that you want to travel, like riding on a Segway, and off you go.

The Ogo is the brainchild of Kevin Halsall and Marcus Thompson. Kevin is a product design engineer and Marcus is a paraplegic. Several years ago, Kevin began trying to develop a device that would increase Marcus’ mobility. With help from Marcus, a prototype was produced. Three major design changes followed.

The Ogo is ready to roll

Now, after a lot of tweaking, the Ogo production line is ready to roll late this summer. The Ogo looks great. It seems as if it could be really useful to any of us who use a scooter to get around, and it sure looks like a whole lot of fun. But it comes with a hefty price tag of just under $17,000. (And that’s without including the cost of shipping from New Zealand, customs fees and, possibly, import tariffs and sales taxes.)

I haven’t tried it myself, and I’m not getting anything from the Ogo folks for writing about their device, but I do want to show it to you.

Take a look:

 

Here are some specs for the Ogo:

  • Length with footrest up: 770 mm / 30.3 inches
  • Height with backrest on: 1 m / 39.4 inches
  • Height with backrest off: 610 mm / 24 inches
  • Width: 630 mm / 25.2 inches. All terrain kit: 830 mm / 32.7 inches
  • Battery x 2: Lithium Ion
  • Battery x 2 weight: 11kg / 24 lbs
  • Travel distance: Up to 38 km / 24.8 miles on a single charge.
  • Weight: 65 kg / 143 lbs
  • Speed: 20 kph / 12 mph

If you think the Ogo is for you, and you have $17,000+ that you can spare, ordering information is at their website.

***

Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

Ed Tobias Editor
Ed Tobias is a retired broadcast journalist. Most of his 40+ year career was spent as a manager with the Associated Press in Washington, DC. Tobias was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 1980 but he continued to work, full-time, meeting interesting people and traveling to interesting places, until retiring at the end of 2012.
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Ed Tobias Editor
Ed Tobias is a retired broadcast journalist. Most of his 40+ year career was spent as a manager with the Associated Press in Washington, DC. Tobias was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 1980 but he continued to work, full-time, meeting interesting people and traveling to interesting places, until retiring at the end of 2012.
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8 comments

  1. Ken weidenaar says:

    The ogo is a very exciting piece of equipment for people like myself who have ms. I currently have a Segway but this may be better. Hope the price comes down to be affordable.

  2. Tony King says:

    Stunning piece of design but at that price there aren’t going to be many takers, especially not here in NZ!

  3. Sait Mentes says:

    Not as much as innovative, of course there are huge functionalities interpreted efficiently but simple things are forgot. There are no side bars to support arms and hands and for the disabled this is a bit painful. Ergonomically, there shall be soft support bars for arms.

    • Ed Tobias says:

      I suppose it depends on your insurance, but I seriously doubt it. As far as I know, most insurance policies don’t even cover a regular electric scooter unless the patient can prove that it’s needed to move around inside his or her house.

  4. Ellyn Camp says:

    Way too expensive for a person who is unable to work and does not have a rich family. It would have to be covered by medical insurance.

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