Living a Grateful Life

Living a Grateful Life


The road to living a grateful life is not always a smooth and paved one. There are curves and roadblocks that can send any thoughts of gratitude far off into the distance. Life is constantly changing and during the lows of living, thankfulness can be the last thing that comes to mind.

Yet, it is during those lows that I find a thankful heart to be one of the most uplifting and beneficial additions to my life. By staying focused on what I am thankful for (instead of concentrating on the potholes), I can stay more focused on what is really important in my life.

According to an article on Today, research has shown practicing gratitude can help improve sleep, lower blood pressure and bring more joy into your life. The biggest joys in my life are my husband, my three children, two daughters-in-law and my grandchildren. I am blessed to have the family the Lord has given me, and I can’t help but feel thankful for them each and everyday.

Since being diagnosed with MS, I am grateful that I am still able to walk with assistance and can have as much independence as I do. By keeping my focus on my gratitude, I can keep my spirits up ― which, in turn, is helpful to my overall health. After dealing with depression throughout my life, I’ve experienced the negative impact it can have on my body. I believe depression kicked my MS into overdrive, so I try to stay as positive as I can.

Being grateful is a learned process. If you are in the habit of seeing the negatives, try to make a conscious effort to look around and find the positives. Believe me, they are there. One example is the open kindness of others.

Yesterday, I was approaching the elevator at the doctor’s office and there was a man with a walker just like me. He pushed the elevator button and the doors opened, but he wasn’t quick enough to get in before the doors closed. The expletives that echoed through the foyer of the building were many, but I didn’t blame him. It is a very frustrating position to be in, being disabled is not easy!

But the positive in that situation was a woman who came to his aid. She quickly pushed the elevator button, the doors opened, she held the doors as he entered. That act of human kindness was a moment to be thankful.

If you take the time to really look, people and things to be thankful for are all around us. The road of life is all about choices, and I have found choosing to live our lives with a thankful heart can bring an abundance of benefits to us, our health and to those around us.

***

Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

4 comments

  1. Tonia Hodgins says:

    Ms veteran of 22years so at 43 I’ve been blessed to meet so many inspirational people! I’ve also lived through too many horrible things! Yet my motto in life is adapt and overcome!

    At 22 I prayed for the day I no longer needed a stupid cane. Years later my wish came true.

    I needed a walker. I prayed that I wouldn’t need it

    Same thing happened and now I need a wheelchair.

    Instead of wasthe Lords time praying for that I finally saw I need to pray out of gratitude and I look everywhere for things to be grateful. There’s an infinite number of things I can be grateful for!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This