#ACTRIMS2018 – Oryzon Enrolls First Patient in SATEEN Trial, Presents New Data at MS Meet

#ACTRIMS2018 – Oryzon Enrolls First Patient in SATEEN Trial, Presents New Data at MS Meet

Oryzon Genomics has enrolled the first multiple sclerosis (MS) patient in its Phase 2a SATEEN clinical trial investigating the therapy ORY-2001.

The Spanish company will also present new results from preclinical models of MS treated with ORY-2001 at the Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) Forum 2018,set for Feb. 1-3 in San Diego.

ORY-2001 is an epigenetic therapy, meaning it targets the expression and activity of genes. The drug inhibits two particular molecules, LSD1 and MAOB, and was previously shown to reduce cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation in preclinical models, including in a mouse model of MS — the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model.

The therapy was also shown to have neuroprotective effects.

During ACTRIMS 2018, Oryzon’s chief scientific officer, Tamara Maes, will present a poster, “ORY-2001 reduces inflammatory cell infiltration in the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus model and highlights the epigenetic axis in MS.

“In previous reports we showed that ORY-2001 reduces the clinical score, lymphocyte egress, immune cell infiltration and inflammation protecting the spinal cord from demyelination in a murine MS-EAE model,” Maes said in a press release. “Here we provide data on the efficacy of ORY-2001 in the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus model for multiple sclerosis.”

In a second poster, “ORY-2001 in multiple sclerosis: first clinical trial of a dual LSD-1/MAOB inhibitor,” Roger Bullock, Oryzon’s chief medical officer, will detail the Phase 2a trial, SATEEN, testing ORY-2001 in patients with relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive MS over a 36-week period, followed by an open-label extension.

“Our first patient enrolled in SATEEN signals a new landmark for the clinical development of this drug in different neurological indications,” said Bullock. “This is the first epigenetic approach in this disease, and we hope that it will contribute to enlarge and improve the therapeutic options for patients afflicted by MS.”

Patricia holds her Ph.D. in Cell Biology from University Nova de Lisboa, and has served as an author on several research projects and fellowships, as well as major grant applications for European Agencies. She also served as a PhD student research assistant in the Laboratory of Doctor David A. Fidock, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Columbia University, New York.
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Patricia holds her Ph.D. in Cell Biology from University Nova de Lisboa, and has served as an author on several research projects and fellowships, as well as major grant applications for European Agencies. She also served as a PhD student research assistant in the Laboratory of Doctor David A. Fidock, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Columbia University, New York.
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