Margarida Maia, PhD, science writer —

Margarida is a biochemist (University of Porto, Portugal) with a PhD in biomedical sciences (VIB and KULeuven, Belgium). Her main interest is science communication. She is also passionate about design and the dialogue between art and science.

Articles by Margarida Maia

Frequency moving to test agents with remyelination potential

Frequency Therapeutics announced that it is shifting its focus to advancing small molecules that aim to restore myelin, the protective cover around nerve fibers that is damaged and lost with multiple sclerosis (MS). This decision follows the failure of an investigative treatment for people with acquired hearing loss to…

Crowdfunding Campaign Launched for MS, Other Clinical Programs

FibroBiologics has launched an online crowdfunding campaign to support the development of potential therapies in the company’s pipeline and advance its clinical programs in multiple sclerosis (MS) and other diseases. The campaign was begun in collaboration with StartEngine, an equity crowdfunding platform that facilitates investments in startup companies.

Aubagio Significantly Lowers Plasma NfL Levels in TERIKIDS Trial

Aubagio (teriflunomide) can significantly reduce plasma neurofilament light chain (pNfL) levels, a biomarker of nerve cell damage, in children and adolescents with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). That’s according to a new analysis of data from TERIKIDS (NCT02201108), the Phase 3 trial that supported expanding Aubagio’s indication in…

Newer Neurologic Therapies Costly, Less Likely to Be Used

Fewer than 1 in 5 people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) or 10 other neurological conditions in the U.S. are on new-to-market medications. That’s according to a large data study funded by the American Academy of Neurology, which also linked more recently available treatments — those approved in the…

How Nasal Foralumab Affects Healthy Immune System: Study

Foralumab nasal spray, an experimental therapy by Tiziana Life Sciences that’s being tested for multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune and nervous system diseases, was found to be safe and able to modulate the immune system in healthy volunteers, a study has found. Researchers failed to detect antibodies…

NMSS Grant Supports Work Into Epstein-Barr Virus as MS Trigger

A National Multiple Sclerosis Society grant is supporting an Australian-led research team aiming to better understand how the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be acting as a trigger for multiple sclerosis (MS). The funding will particularly be used to understand what molecules are being targeted by lymphocytes, immune cells that…

4 Weeks of Nabiximols Found to Ease Spasticity in MS Pilot Study

Four weeks of treatment with nabiximols — an oral spray containing compounds found in the cannabis plant — significantly reduced spasticity and generally improved arm and hand function in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with moderate-to-severe spasticity, according to a small pilot study in Italy. Notably, after nabiximols, patients showed…

High-intensity Resistance Training May Help MS Patients With Fatigue

Three months of once-weekly sessions of high-intensity resistance training — consisting of strength exercises followed by a short recovery between sets — effectively eased fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients experiencing low energy and tiredness, a trial in Sweden shows. This intervention also lessened feelings of depression and anxiety,…

Eye Scans May Help to Diagnose MS in Children

A machine learning approach based on eye scans was employed by researchers to diagnose multiple sclerosis (MS) in children with up to 80% accuracy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans also provided enough data to diagnose other demyelinating diseases with 75% accuracy. OCT is an imaging tool that uses…

RRMS Onset Taking Place at Older Ages Over Past 50 Years

The first symptoms of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) have been appearing increasingly later in life, according to a Spanish study covering nearly five decades. From the 1970s through the 2010s, the average age at disease onset rose by more than 10 years in both men and women, its researchers…