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MS News That Caught My Eye Last Week: Plegridy, Telemedicine, AI for MS, Myelin Repair

MS News That Caught My Eye Last Week: Plegridy, Telemedicine, AI for MS, Myelin Repair
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FDA Approves Plegridy as Intramuscular Injection for Relapsing MS

A common patient complaint about Plegridy has been that its subcutaneous injection procedure results in injection site reactions. This new formulation is delivered into the muscle, rather than under the skin. The needle is longer, but Biogen pharmaceuticals thinks the reactions should be fewer.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved an intramuscular injection formulation of Plegridy (peginterferon beta-1a) to treat people with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS).

This formulation, for injection directly into muscle, is what is typically used to deliver the flu shot.

Click here to read the full story.

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Telemedicine Found Effective During Italy’s COVID-19 Lockdown

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, several well-known MS neurologists have been conducting virtual exams of their patients. On the other hand, my neurologist, whom I think the world of, doesn’t think telemedicine is a good idea for the patients she sees. Here’s an interesting look at the benefits of technology for MS examinations when you can’t do anything else.

Telemedicine is a feasible and effective method of remote care for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, an Italian study suggests.

The study, “Telemedicine during the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Pandemic: A Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Outpatients Service Perspective,” was published in the journal Neurology International.

Click here to read the full story.

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European Project Uses Artificial Intelligence to Help Improve Patient Care

Technology for MS care isn’t limited to virtual office visits. The BRAINTEASER project will be testing the use of apps and wearable sensors to monitor disease progression, clinical data, and lifestyle information of MS patients. The goal is to shift patient care from reactive to proactive, and to help people with MS participate more fully in that care.

The recently launched BRAINTEASER project focuses on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) technology to improve the care of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

An initiative of a European consortium, BRAINTEASER could benefit patients, caregivers, and clinicians by enhancing the ability to predict, detect, and manage factors that contribute to disease progression. 

Click here to read the full story.

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Potential for Stem Cells to Repair Myelin Focus of University Toronto Team

I often mention the ongoing need for greater availability of stem cell treatments for people with MS. The research reported here is investigating whether those stem cells might have another use, one that seems to me to be as important as reducing disease progression: remyelination. This project is just getting off the ground, but I think it has the right target in its sights.

Teams of scientists at the University of Toronto are sharing a nearly CA$21 million (about $16.36 million) award into research that might lead to self-repair treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological disorders, the university announced in a press release.

Eleven teams at the university and its partner hospitals will share the three-year grant from Medicine by Design, a University of Toronto research initiative focused on advancing regenerative medicine and cell therapy through interdisciplinary research.

Click here to read the full story.

Check out discussions of these and other subjects that might catch your eye at our MS News Today Forums.

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Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today or its parent company, BioNews, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

Diagnosed with MS at age 32 in 1980, Ed has written the “MS Wire” column for Multiple Sclerosis News Today since August 2016. He presents timely information on MS, blended with personal experiences. Before retiring from full-time work in 2012, Tobias spent more than four decades in broadcast and on-line newsrooms as a manager, reporter, and radio news anchor. He’s won several national broadcast awards. As an MS patient communicator, Ed consults with healthcare and social media companies. He’s the author of “We’re Not Drunk, We Have MS: A tool kit for people living with multiple sclerosis.” Ed and his wife split time between the Washington, D.C. suburbs and Florida’s Gulf Coast.
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Diagnosed with MS at age 32 in 1980, Ed has written the “MS Wire” column for Multiple Sclerosis News Today since August 2016. He presents timely information on MS, blended with personal experiences. Before retiring from full-time work in 2012, Tobias spent more than four decades in broadcast and on-line newsrooms as a manager, reporter, and radio news anchor. He’s won several national broadcast awards. As an MS patient communicator, Ed consults with healthcare and social media companies. He’s the author of “We’re Not Drunk, We Have MS: A tool kit for people living with multiple sclerosis.” Ed and his wife split time between the Washington, D.C. suburbs and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

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4 comments

    • Ed Tobias says:

      Hello Daniel,

      All is well here. We have had our first COVID vaccine and have the second scheduled for 3 March. I hope these will bring us closer to resuming a normal life.

      I hope all is well with you and your family.

      Ed

    • Ed Tobias says:

      Hello Kamil,

      There is a lot of research underway about remyelination but I’m not aware of any treatment that accomplishes it. You can find several articles on the subject if you search for remyelination on this website.

      Ed

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