Amitriptyline as a Treatment for Pain Management in Multiple Sclerosis

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by Wendy Henderson |

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Aside from treating depression, some antidepressants can be used for pain management in multiple sclerosis (MS). Amitriptyline (Elavil) is a tricyclic antidepressant which works by blocking the effects of two neurotransmitters called noradrenaline and serotonin. Source: patient.info

Read our 26 tips to help manage common MS symptoms.

Amitriptyline is taken orally and is used to treat multiple sclerosis patients who may be suffering from nerve pain in the limbs such as pins and needles, stabbing pains, or burning sensations. The drug changes the way that nerves in the central nervous system react to pain.

Possible side effects of the drug include a black tongue, mouth pain, strange taste in the mouth, appetite or weight changes, gastric disorders, less frequent urination, and sexual changes such as decreased sex drive, difficulty in orgasming, and impotence.

Less common but more serious side effects include the risk of suicidal thoughts in children, teenager and young adults who also suffer from depression or psychiatric problems. These usually occur during the first few months of treatment or after a change in dosage.

Find out about some of the possible early symptoms of multiple sclerosis.

Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

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