Common Allergy Treatment Restores Protective Neuron Coating in MS, Trial Suggests

Common Allergy Treatment Restores Protective Neuron Coating in MS, Trial Suggests

The first step

Although the results were noteworthy, the improvements were “modest and probably not of a clinically meaningful magnitude,” in the opinion of two researchers from the Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. They also pointed out that it might be difficult to increase the dose of clemastine fumarate or the duration of treatment because of side effects.

The UC-San Francisco research team is not trying to claim that their study is the final solution to remyelination.

“This is the first step in a long process,” said Green, who is also a Debbie and Andy Rachleff Distinguished Professor of Neurology, chief of the university’s Division of Neuroinflammation and Glial Biology, and medical director of the UCSF Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroinflammation Center.

“By no means do we want to suggest that this is a cure-all,” he said. “We want to ground-truth myelination metrics. We’re designing the crucible that’s going to be used to test any future method for detecting remyelination.”

The researchers who wrote the commentary shared this opinion.

“Although clemastine fumarate probably is not the final answer to the search for repair-promoting drugs to treat multiple sclerosis, the ReBUILD trial represents a watershed milestone in that quest,” they wrote.

Patrícia holds her PhD in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases from the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, The Netherlands. She has studied Applied Biology at Universidade do Minho and was a postdoctoral research fellow at Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal. Her work has been focused on molecular genetic traits of infectious agents such as viruses and parasites.
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Patrícia holds her PhD in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases from the Leiden University Medical Center in Leiden, The Netherlands. She has studied Applied Biology at Universidade do Minho and was a postdoctoral research fellow at Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal. Her work has been focused on molecular genetic traits of infectious agents such as viruses and parasites.

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