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MS and heavy metals


The jury is still out on the role, if any, that heavy metals play in multiple sclerosis. Many theories have been floating around for years regarding the possible connection between MS and dental amalgams, pesticides, additives to food, lead paint in older homes … and the list goes on.

The National Multiple Sclerosis website, under its list of disproved theories, has this to say: “Although poisoning with heavy metals such as mercury, lead or manganese can damage the nervous system and produce symptoms such as tremor and weakness, both the process and the symptoms are different from what occurs in MS. There is no evidence that heavy metal exposure causes MS.”

Maybe there is no concrete evidence to prove heavy metals contribute to this disease, but I also couldn’t find any concrete evidence to prove that they don’t.

In an online search I conducted, I found that some of the most common symptoms of heavy metal toxicity include: chronic fatigue, autoimmune disease, neurological disorders, brain fog, depression, bipolar, anxiety, dementia, and insomnia. Any of those sound familiar to us with MS?!

It doesn’t take being a rocket scientist to figure out that toxic hardware embedded in your tissues is a bad thing. So it is best to just get rid of it.

For me, the first place to check if — or what kind of — alloys I had floating around inside me was to visit a naturopathic doctor.

My naturopath was able to test for metals with lab work and a hair sample. The results came back that I have not just one but many metals in my system. One that really baffled her was traces of the dye gadolinium from my contrasting MRIs.

Another reason I recommend seeing a naturopathic doctor for chelation therapy (removal of heavy metals) is that the supplements they use are for fast and hardcore detox, and can sometimes leave you not feeling all that great, so it is best to be under a doctor’s care while on those supplements.

If cost is an issue, as not all insurances cover naturopathic providers, detox can also be taken a little more slowly, yet still effectively, on your own. Of course, it is always best to consult with your primary doctor before starting anything new.

Fruit and vegetables high in vitamin C, cilantro, and other leafy green vegetables, garlic and onion, and drinking 8 ounces of water or vegetable juice every two hours to help flush out toxins are all helpful in removing metals.

A list of things to avoid are farmed fish, food allergens, non-organic foods, foods with additives, and alcohol.

Top recommended detox supplements are chlorella, vitamin C, cilantro, milk thistle, and probiotics. These I would definitely check out with a doctor before using. Checking on drug interactions and doses is always a smart thing to do.

It is recommended to have your magnesium levels checked before starting any serious chelation program. The trace mineral helps promote “relaxed arteries,” which can make eliminating the toxins easier on your body.

Hopefully, by detoxing our bodies of heavy metals, we can see some improvement in our health and possibly ward off other potential problems in the future.

Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

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Debi is a retired Admissions and Marketing Director and currently resides in Oregon. She is married and the Mother of three grown children and has three Grandchildren. She was diagnosed with PPMS in 2010. She hopes to help and inspire others that are also dealing with MS.
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