News

Early High-efficacy Therapies May Be Better to Eliminate MS Activity

Using high-efficacy therapies as a first treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients significantly increases the likelihood of having no evidence of disease activity after one and two years, compared to using moderately effective therapies, according to a real-world study of Norwegian patients. However, with each additional attempted treatment, the…

US Study: Black Patients Have More Severe Disease Than Whites

Blacks with multiple sclerosis (MS) have more severe disease and greater disability at their first visit than white patients, even when differences in socioeconomic status are taken into account, a large U.S. study found. The data showed that Black patients with MS had lower scores on some measures of…

Trials of IMU-838 in RRMS, Progressive MS Start Later This Year

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared Immunic Therapeutics to initiate two clinical trials of its investigational medication IMU-838 (vidofludimus calcium) in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), as well as a separate trial for people with progressive types of MS. The RRMS clinical trial program, expected…

Destroying Myelin-damaging Immune Cells May Be New Therapy

Vesicles containing the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin can be used to destroy the aberrant, myelin-damaging immune cells that contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS), suppressing the progression of the neurodegenerative disorder, according to recent research findings using a mouse model. If further validated, this technique could provide physicians with a new…

Familial MS Most Common in Children, Women, Warmer Climates

Inherited or familial multiple sclerosis (MS) occurs most frequently in children, women, and people living in warmer climates, a new study suggests. Prevalence rates also differ according to geographical areas, with Canada exhibiting the highest rates and Hungary the lowest. The study, “The global prevalence of familial multiple sclerosis:…

Sleep Deprivation May Worsen Memory in Early MS

Sleep deprivation may worsen memory in people with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a new observational study suggests. A link also was observed between a lack of sleep and worse cognitive efficiency in early MS, but that association was caused by the worse moods…

Progressive MS Projects Earn Research Challenge Awards

The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada has granted its International Progressive MS Alliance (Alliance) Research Challenge Awards to 19 researchers for their work on progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Among them is Jennifer Gommerman, PhD, a professor at the University of Toronto, in Canada, who will use…

Early Use of High-efficacy DMTs Favor Lesser Disability Over Time

Long-term disability outcomes tend to be better in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who are treated early on with highly effective therapies, a study based on patient registry data indicates. The study, “Long-term disability trajectories in relapsing multiple sclerosis patients treated with early intensive or…

Raised Serum NfL Levels May Indicate Chronic Active Lesions

Raised serum neurofilament light chain (sNfL) levels may indicate the presence of brain lesions with chronically active inflammation that are linked with more aggressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a new study suggests. People with high sNfL levels, the study revealed, had greater numbers of chronic inflammation lesions and…

MIND Diet May Protect Brain Tissue in MS

A higher adherence to the MIND diet – short for Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension Intervention (DASH) for Neurodegenerative Delay – may protect brain tissue from further damage in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), new research suggests. In particular, consuming more high-fat dairy products was associated with a lower…

MS Symptoms Often Apparent Years Before Diagnosis

Many people with multiple sclerosis (MS) start experiencing symptoms of the disease several years before being diagnosed, a new study suggests. While it has long been known that people with MS tend to seek medical attention more frequently in the years before diagnosis than those without the disease, there…

High Free Light Chains Levels May Indicate Sooner Second Relapse

High levels of kappa-free light chains, or kappa-FLC, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) — the liquid surrounding the brain and spinal cord — may help identify people with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) who will progress sooner to multiple sclerosis (MS), a study reports. Overall, those with a high…

Long-term Kesimpta Use Not Seen in Trial to Depress Antibody Levels

Long-term use of Kesimpta (ofatumumab) among people with multiple sclerosis (MS) did not substantially lower their antibody levels, allowing them to retain an ability to fight infections, new data from a Phase 3 clinical trial indicate. “These long-term results continue to support Kesimpta as a high-efficacy, first-choice treatment with…

Advocates ‘Roll’ on Capitol Hill for Disability Rights

In an effort to make sure those with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D) are included in disability legislation, the United Spinal Association and some 200 advocates recently gathered virtually for this year’s “Roll on Capitol Hill.” The annual event, in which advocates met with lawmakers, gives organization members…

MS-related Fatigue Strongly Affects Youngsters’ Functioning

Multiple sclerosis and its associated fatigue negatively affect school performance, mental health, and physical and social functioning in children and adolescents with the disease, according to a review study. Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS) also was associated with negative effects on social functioning, mental health, and quality of life in…

Oral Aubagio Approved in EU for Children With RRMS, Ages 10-17

The European Commission (EC) has approved Aubagio (teriflunomide) for the treatment of children and adolescents, ages 10 to 17, with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Aubagio, approved for adults with RRMS since 2013, is now the first oral therapy available as a first-line treatment for pediatric patients in the European…

Results: Ponvory Outperforms Aubagio in OPTIMUM Clinical Trial

In the OPTIMUM clinical trial, Ponvory (ponesimod) significantly outperformed Aubagio (teriflunomide) in reducing relapse rates, fatigue, and evidence of brain damage among people with relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Based on these results, Ponvory has now been approved in the U.S. and the European Union as a treatment…

Younger Age, DMT Use at Early Relapse May Lessen Later Disability

People with  multiple sclerosis (MS) who are using a disease-modifying therapy — and are at a younger age — when they have a relapse within the first three years of their disease course are more likely to recover completely, lowering their risk of long-term, 10-year disability, a study suggests. Complete recovery…

The Multiple Sclerosis Podcast


Survey Icon

Video