MS News That Caught My Eye Last Week: CBD, Sativex, Lemtrada, Sexual Dysfunction

MS News That Caught My Eye Last Week: CBD, Sativex, Lemtrada, Sexual Dysfunction
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Public-private Partnership Will Assess Therapy Potential, Effects of CBD

Have you tried using CBD to treat your MS? I have. I’d hoped it would ease my leg spasms. Some people say it helps, but neither drops under my tongue nor salve rubbed onto my legs seemed to help me. Though this study focuses on brain inflammation rather than CBD’s efficacy in reducing symptoms, there’s been so little rigorous research into the medical use of cannabinoids that I welcome any.

Open Book Extracts (OBX) and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have partnered to investigate how cannabinoids like CBD affect brain cells, particularly in regard to neuroinflammation, according to an OBX press release.

CBD (cannabidiol) and other cannabinoids, such as THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), have attracted interest for their potential in treating symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders like multiple sclerosis (MS). For example, the CBD:THC-based nasal spray Sativex has been found to reduce the pain and severity of involuntary muscle contractions in MS. Such contractions are known as spasticity.

Click here to read the full story.

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GW Pharma Plans More Clinical Trials for Sativex

Speaking of research involving cannabinoids, here’s an announcement about Sativex, an oral spray that combines THC and CBD to treat spasticity. This is the second time in the past few months that I’ve read an announcement about more Sativex trials. Two are underway in Poland, but no sites in North America have yet been announced. When I checked with GW Pharmaceuticals several weeks ago, I was told to just keep checking. As of the end of last week, despite what their news release says, there’s still nothing.

GW Pharmaceuticals is planning to continue recruiting patients into two pivotal Phase 3 clinical trials of Sativex (nabiximols), an oral spray that contains cannabis extracts and is being investigated as a potential add-on therapy for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spasticity.

The company also is planning to launch three additional clinical trials in the U.S. focused on exploring Sativex’s therapeutic potential for the treatment of spasticity (muscle stiffness or spasms) associated with MS.

Click here to read the full story.

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Lemtrada May Slow MS Disease Progression, Long-term Study Suggests

It’s been nearly three years since I completed my second round of Lemtrada. I was diagnosed with SPMS before being treated with Lemtrada, my fourth disease-modifying therapy. I think Lemtrada has slowed my progression, but I think my other DMTs have done the same. Has Lemtrada been more effective? I think so, but it’s hard to say.

Lemtrada (alemtuzumab) may slow the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) and lower the conversion rate of relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) to secondary progressive MS (SPMS), a long-term study suggests.

The results showed that patients converting to SPMS — in which a person’s disability gets steadily worse — were older, had longer disease duration, and had greater brain lesions.

Click here to read the full story.

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Sexual Dysfunction Common in Men with MS, Review Finds

This comes as no surprise. The point of this review, however, seems to be that sexual problems — for both men and women — need to be discussed openly with neurologists, and they’re not. Again, no surprise.

Sexual dysfunction affects more than 60% of adult men with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a review study.

The data add to previous findings showing that more than two-thirds of women with MS also experience these problems, highlighting the importance of detecting and managing sexual dysfunction in this patient population, the researchers noted.

Click here to read the full story.

Have you checked out our MS forums? Many of these topics will be discussed there. Come join us.

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Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today or its parent company, BioNews, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

Diagnosed with MS at age 32 in 1980, Ed has written the “MS Wire” column for Multiple Sclerosis News Today since August 2016. He presents timely information on MS, blended with personal experiences. Before retiring from full-time work in 2012, Tobias spent more than four decades in broadcast and on-line newsrooms as a manager, reporter, and radio news anchor. He’s won several national broadcast awards. As an MS patient communicator, Ed consults with healthcare and social media companies. He’s the author of “We’re Not Drunk, We Have MS: A tool kit for people living with multiple sclerosis.” Ed and his wife split time between the Washington, D.C. suburbs and Florida’s Gulf Coast.
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Diagnosed with MS at age 32 in 1980, Ed has written the “MS Wire” column for Multiple Sclerosis News Today since August 2016. He presents timely information on MS, blended with personal experiences. Before retiring from full-time work in 2012, Tobias spent more than four decades in broadcast and on-line newsrooms as a manager, reporter, and radio news anchor. He’s won several national broadcast awards. As an MS patient communicator, Ed consults with healthcare and social media companies. He’s the author of “We’re Not Drunk, We Have MS: A tool kit for people living with multiple sclerosis.” Ed and his wife split time between the Washington, D.C. suburbs and Florida’s Gulf Coast.

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4 comments

  1. Bob rob says:

    Smoke the CBD. And add a little THC. Then see if it helps. Salves don’t really work, there are some receptors in the skin but they are not many.

  2. Edith Mcbride says:

    I use the Broad spectrum from Lazarus Naturals. And it help a lot. When the pain is to much I use a 1/2 dropper full and I’m good.

  3. Edee McBride says:

    Why don’t they have some thing for women with sexual dysfunction for women??? I,had MS since I was 20ish. And never have been good with the dysfunction. I’m now 61 and I would think by now it would be great together.My husband has alwsys been open to try anything.

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