A Nod to the Long-running Comedy Show ‘No Sex Please, We’re British’

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by John Connor |

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“No Sex Please, We’re British” was a British farce that opened in London’s West End in 1971 and ran until 1987. It was panned by critics, but having “Sex” in the title sure was a winner, helping it to run for 17 years. Let’s hope some of this rubs off on this column!

A new review study reported on by Marta Figueiredo noted that more than 60% of adult men with MS are affected by sexual dysfunction. Hands up if this affects you! (I can only raise one hand.)

I haven’t had an orgasm for about a year, and that was only because I was on a full dose of steroids. Somehow they knit together the complex series of events to make one possible. I may soon find out if this is still possible, because my neurologist said I would be taking them again!

I mentioned this sex study report in my role as co-moderator of the MS News Today Forums. If you haven’t delved into our forums, go on, give it a go!

As was pointed out by one forum member, “What about the women?” Women with MS outnumber men by something like 3 to 1, so you’d think there’d be plenty of research. The report in Multiple Sclerosis News Today does mention women: “Several studies have pointed out that sexual problems — affecting sexual desire, arousal, erection, orgasm, and pain — are highly common among MS patients, regardless of gender. Notably, women with MS also were found to be at a higher risk of sexual dysfunction than those without the disease.”

I thought I’d bring it up as this is an area we all know about but hardly ever discuss.

The report in précis notes, “Still, most MS patients do not discuss such problems with their physicians or healthcare providers, leaving them unaddressed and ultimately affecting the patients’ mood, relationships, daily functioning, and quality of life.”

When I’ve mentioned these problems to any of my medical people, it’s pretty obvious they have no answers. Sniff around on the internet and it’s the same!

So, discussing it is the only thing many of us have left!

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Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today or its parent company, BioNews, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

Comments

Jane Montgomery avatar

Jane Montgomery

I am a woman with MS and depression for whom arousal has been a problem off and on over the past 25 years. I see a urologist and he has had some effective treatment strategies.

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John Connor avatar

John Connor

Well as women are somewhat poorly served by this research perhaps you could share them please. Cheers John

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