Thin But Persistent Regrowth of Myelin Layers Sign of Health in CNS, Study Says

Thin But Persistent Regrowth of Myelin Layers Sign of Health in CNS, Study Says
0
(0)

The generation of a thin myelin sheath during remyelination — one that continues to protect nerve cells over time — is indicative of the long-term health and activity of the central nervous system (CNS) in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), a new study shows.

These findings, which aim to settle a scientific debate about CNS healing, are reported in the study “Thin myelin sheaths as the hallmark of remyelination persist over time and preserve axon function,” published in the journal PNAS.

The myelin sheath is an insulating layer of lipids (fats) and proteins that wrap around nerves. It works to speed the transmission of signals from the nerves to muscles, in order for a person to carry out activities such as walking, talking, and breathing.

Remyelination, which refers to a process through which the body rebuilds the myelin sheath when it has been stripped away due to disease, is the most powerful form of repair for the brain and the spinal cord in patients with a demyelinating disease. In the recovery phase of a disease, the body will completely remyelinate areas that have been stripped of myelin.

MS is a demyelinating disease, and in these patients remyelination can be quite extensive. The ability of the body to remyelinate nerve cells can also decline as a person ages.

Iqra holds a MSc in Cellular and Molecular Medicine from the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Canada. She also holds a BSc in Life Sciences from Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada. Currently, she is completing a PhD in Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology from the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada. Her research has ranged from across various disease areas including Alzheimer’s disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, bleeding disorders and rare pediatric brain tumors.
×
Iqra holds a MSc in Cellular and Molecular Medicine from the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Canada. She also holds a BSc in Life Sciences from Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada. Currently, she is completing a PhD in Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology from the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada. Her research has ranged from across various disease areas including Alzheimer’s disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, bleeding disorders and rare pediatric brain tumors.
Latest Posts
  • Bafiertam approved
  • Covid-19 and patient care
  • Bafiertam approved
  • ACTRIMS 2020 and Calabresi

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 0 / 5. Vote count: 0

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

As you found this post useful...

Follow us on social media!

We are sorry that this post was not useful for you!

Let us improve this post!

Tell us how we can improve this post?