Still, I Am Grateful and Giving Thanks

Still, I Am Grateful and Giving Thanks

Patiently Awakened
I can’t believe Thanksgiving is only a few days away. Time truly passes quickly. The holidays are bittersweet for me; I experience both joy and unrest. I believe there are others who can relate. The holiday season can be stressful and I always try to pace myself. In addition, I remember those family and friends who may not be in a celebratory state of mind.

November is the month that I had my second open-heart surgery. I also received my MS diagnosis after Thanksgiving. In addition, my beloved sister, was terminally ill from cancer. Her last Thanksgiving was spent in the hospital, so this time of year brings back vivid memories of her illness and ultimately her passing. Thus, when I say that November is bittersweet, you can understand why.

Although November is where I celebrate life, it also reminds me of the loss of life. Loss is something that we never recover from. When we lose someone, something or our quality of life, we don’t “just get over it.” It leaves a permanent void. When we think that we’ve managed to move on, a memory, moment, song, or a dream pushes us to enter right back into that feeling of grief.

Personal experience and talking to others have taught me that loss feels more pronounced during the holiday season. It is the time when families gather to reflect on poignant memories. Every Thanksgiving I look around and realize that my circle decreases. The absence of my siblings, relatives, in-laws and friends come to mind. Each year, we learn new ways to live with the loss. That is never easy.

In spite of the conundrum that the holiday season places me in, I try my best to practice gratitude. I realize that I am alive by grace and mercy — and that is worth a hearty thank you. I thank my creator, for He allows me to see a new day. I think about the days prior to my open-heart surgery, back when my parents and I were warned about the perils of surgery and all that could happen. I am thankful that I survived. I am grateful that even in illness, I am thriving. I also think about my friends, warriors and survivors who experience intense pain and grief through this season. I give thanks for their lives, and I pray for their strength and peace. I make time to reach out to those who are struggling.

The intent of this week’s column is multifaceted. I am writing to encourage you and to remind each of us that grace is sufficient. I am grateful for the family and friends I have. I remain thankful knowing that I am loved, and that my heart still beats. I truly believe that God will not give me more than I can bear, and I am thankful because I remember that in weakness, I am made strong. I am grateful for you, and how your stories and comments have touched my heart and have changed my life. I feel gratitude because I know we have each other and that we really are never alone.

In addition to expressing gratitude, I want to tell all of those who are struggling this holiday season that I am thinking of you. I want you to know that, although it seems as if you are stagnant in this valley, you will rise. You will see your way out. Be kind to yourself and be patient with yourself. Your feelings are relevant and you are entitled to take all the time you need.

Our grief allows us to grow in patience, empathy and appreciation. I used to sing a song in the children’s choir that said “everything will be alright.” I trust that it will be alright for all of us.

Finally, to those who know others who are struggling or having a hard time getting through the holiday season, please reach out to them. This season can be a lonely time for many. A phone call, a card, an encouraging word, any act of kindness can make a huge difference. Remind people of the good still left in the world. Remember, we are all connected. Being present in this moment and being grateful is the goal.

You are invited to subscribe to my website at www.teresawrightjohnson.com

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Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

2 comments

  1. jules says:

    as i just land home with the same emptions this article made me smile i was diagnosed and hospitalized around the holidays 2015 so i am touchy too thanks for the reminder of ALL of the Blessings Abound. i would love to connect Happy Holidays

    • Teresa Wright-Johnson says:

      Hi Jules,
      Thanks for your response and Happy Holidays to you. You keep smiling and counting your blessings. All the best to you!

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