motor function

Magnetic brain stimulation aids motor function, balance in MS trial

Coupling a noninvasive brain stimulation procedure with an intensive rehabilitation program significantly improved motor function and balance in adults with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a randomized clinical trial finds. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive treatment approach that delivers pulses of magnetic fields to modulate nerve…

Robotic Exoskeleton Intervention Improves Motor, Cognitive Function

Four weeks of robotic exoskeleton-assisted exercise rehabilitation, called REAER, worked better than conventional gait training in improving mobility and cognitive function in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with substantial walking difficulties, according to a small trial. A robotic exoskeleton consists of an externally worn device that encases a user’s hips, back,…

New Products Intended to Stimulate Feet of MS Patients

Naboso Technology has expanded its product offerings with new insoles and training mats specifically designed to stimulate the nervous system through the skin on the bottom of the feet. The products were developed to help improve balance, posture, movement and restore motor function, as part of a neurorehabilitation strategy…

MS Patients’ Handwriting Ability Correlates with Movement, Sensory and Cognitive Impairment, Study Shows

A deterioration in multiple sclerosis patients' handwriting aligns with drops in their movement, sensory and cognitive skills, a study reports. MS includes loss of hand dexterity and finger movement control. This affects a patient's capacity to manipulate objects and coordinate hand movement, skills needed in handwriting. Previous studies have shown that MS patients had less handwriting rhythm and control than healthy people. This time researchers decided to compare the handwriting movements of both MS patients and healthy volunteers. The research involved 19 MS patients and 22 healthy age-matched controls. The team asked participants to write a specific sentence on a digitizing tablet. They discovered that the way MS patients wrote was much different than those of the controls. The patients took a lot longer to write each word and to achieve spacing between words. This led to them taking a much longer time overall to write a sentence than healthy people. In addition, analysis of handwriting strokes showed that MS patients' writing wasn't as smooth as that of healthy people. Researchers also found a correlation between patients’ movement abilities and cognitive status on the one hand and their handwriting ability on the other. The team said it believed “these findings might be very useful when planning rehabilitative task-oriented interventions focused on handwriting abilities.” In fact, rehabilitation specialists should consider evaluating “both the motor movement and the cognitive status of PwMS [patients with MS] in order to tailor the intervention."

#CMSC16 – Robot-assisted Rehabilitation May Improve MS Patient Locomotor Function

Robot-assisted training may be an effective therapy to improve motor function in the lower limbs of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and help in rehabilitation, according to the study “Robot-Guided Rehabilitation Improves Sensorimotor Functions in Lower-Limb Impairments of Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis,” presented at the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers…