Author Archives: Somi Igbene

Hypertension Triples Disability Risk in Hispanic/Latino MS Patients

Hypertension — high blood pressure — triples the risk of severe walking disability in Hispanic and Latino people with multiple sclerosis (MS), a new observational study reports. The study, “Hypertension and hypertension severity in Hispanics/Latinx with MS,” was published in the Multiple Sclerosis Journal. Although…

Multivitamins Reduce Fatigue, Improving Quality of Life

Multivitamin supplements reduce fatigue and improve quality of life in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a new study reports. After 70 days of continuous use, patients taking multivitamin supplements containing vitamins A, B-complex, C, and D improved their blood antioxidant status and experienced up to a 34% reduction…

Strength of Exhalations May Predict Physical Ability, MS Severity

The strength of the muscles used to exhale a breath may predict physical ability and disease severity in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), a study reported. Patients in this study with weaker expiratory muscles were also those with greater physical disability and more severe disease. The study, “Pulmonary…

Isoflavone-rich Diet Boosts Gut Health, Lessening MS Severity

Isoflavone-rich diets boost gut health and lessen multiple sclerosis (MS) severity, a new study in mice suggests. In the study, mice with MS that were fed a diet rich in isoflavone — a plant-based compound — developed diverse and abundant gut bacteria, particularly isoflavone-digesting bacteria, which produced compounds that…

Patients Less Likely to Stop Taking Tecfidera Than Aubagio: Study

Tecfidera has a lower risk of discontinuation due to treatment failure than Aubagio in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), a new observational study in Norway suggests. In the study, people receiving Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate) were 38% less likely to experience treatment failure and stop use than those receiving…

Familial MS Most Common in Children, Women, Warmer Climates

Inherited or familial multiple sclerosis (MS) occurs most frequently in children, women, and people living in warmer climates, a new study suggests. Prevalence rates also differ according to geographical areas, with Canada exhibiting the highest rates and Hungary the lowest. The study, “The global prevalence of familial multiple sclerosis:…

Sleep Deprivation May Worsen Memory in Early MS

Sleep deprivation may worsen memory in people with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a new observational study suggests. A link also was observed between a lack of sleep and worse cognitive efficiency in early MS, but that association was caused by the worse moods…

Raised Serum NfL Levels May Indicate Chronic Active Lesions

Raised serum neurofilament light chain (sNfL) levels may indicate the presence of brain lesions with chronically active inflammation that are linked with more aggressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a new study suggests. People with high sNfL levels, the study revealed, had greater numbers of chronic inflammation lesions and…

MIND Diet May Protect Brain Tissue in MS

A higher adherence to the MIND diet – short for Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension Intervention (DASH) for Neurodegenerative Delay – may protect brain tissue from further damage in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), new research suggests. In particular, consuming more high-fat dairy products was associated with a lower…

High Free Light Chains Levels May Indicate Sooner Second Relapse

High levels of kappa-free light chains, or kappa-FLC, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) — the liquid surrounding the brain and spinal cord — may help identify people with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) who will progress sooner to multiple sclerosis (MS), a study reports. Overall, those with a high…

Younger Age, DMT Use at Early Relapse May Lessen Later Disability

People with  multiple sclerosis (MS) who are using a disease-modifying therapy — and are at a younger age — when they have a relapse within the first three years of their disease course are more likely to recover completely, lowering their risk of long-term, 10-year disability, a study suggests. Complete recovery…

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