Somi Igbene, PhD, science writer —

Somi graduated from Imperial College London in 2011 with a PhD in cellular and molecular immunology. She worked as a medical writer at several medical communications agencies in London, including Core Medica. Besides science writing, Somi works as a registered associate nutritionist, helping adults and children improve their diets to prevent type 2 diabetes.

Articles by Somi Igbene

Treatments Seen to Account for Largest Part of MS Financial Burden

Medications account for the majority of costs related to managing multiple sclerosis (MS) in Italy, and secondary-progressive MS (SPMS) is associated with higher treatment and healthcare costs than those for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a study looking at real-world data reported. “A bigger healthcare resource consumption was retrieved for…

Ketogenic Diet Eases Symptoms, Aids Life Quality in Small RRMS Study

A short-term ketogenic diet, which dramatically cuts carbohydrate consumption, is safe and results in significant improvements in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a small study in patients reported. “Our study provides evidence that a ketogenic diet is safe and beneficial, reducing some symptoms for people with MS, when…

Regular Eye Screening Vital for MS Patients, Study Finds

Visual disturbances are common in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), particularly among those with secondary progressive MS (SPMS), longer disease duration, and worse disability status, a new study has found. Yet, “visual complaints may occur in people with all types of MS, anytime along the disease course, and…

Long-term Supplement Use May Improve Gait, Strength in RRMS

Long-term use of a high-dose nutritional supplement containing specific antioxidant vitamins and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids may boost walking performance and other measures of functional capacity in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a new study found. The study, “The Effects of Specific Omega-3 and…

Longer Breastfeeding May Damage Brain By Delaying DMT Use

Having at least one pregnancy may lower disability scores in women with multiple sclerosis (MS), but breastfeeding for longer than six months may worsen damage to the brain, an observational study in patients has found. Findings support the need for careful pregnancy planning, counseling, and treatment management to ensure…

COVID-19 Stalling MS Research Into Rehabilitation, Quality of Life

The COVID-19 pandemic appears to be stalling research into rehabilitation and quality of life (QoL) for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in many countries worldwide, a new observational study reports. According to the study, many researchers have found it “significantly more” challenging to recruit participants for studies, and most…

Mount Sinai MS Experts Earn Hope Award

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has granted its 2021 Hope Award to two multiple sclerosis (MS) experts at Mount Sinai Health System for their clinical ingenuity and significant research contributions that have uplifted individuals, families and communities affected with the chronic condition. Aaron Miller, MD, professor of neurology…

Health Status of Immigrants With MS Complex, Canadian Study Finds

A number of health conditions — including high blood pressure, migraines, schizophrenia, and rheumatoid arthritis — are more common among immigrants to Canada who have multiple sclerosis (MS) than those without MS, an observational study reported. Compared with long-term residents with MS, immigrants with this disease were less likely to…

FDA to Review ANI’s Request for Cortrophin Gel Use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has agreed to review ANI Pharmaceuticals’ supplemental new drug application for the approval of Cortrophin Gel to treat people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other chronic inflammatory conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis. Purified Cortrophin Gel (repository corticotropin injection USP) is a purified…

Pain, Fatigue, Anxiety Common in First Year After CIS/MS Diagnosis

People newly diagnosed with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently experience pain, fatigue, depression, and anxiety in the first year after diagnosis, a new study finds. Fatigue was reported by almost two-thirds of new patients, and half experienced pain. Many individuals experienced multiple symptoms simultaneously,…

Ocrevus Reduces MS Relapse Risk, But Linked to More Hospitalizations

Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) reduces relapse risk and slows disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) but also is associated with higher hospitalization rates in older people with relapsing forms of the disease, a new observational study reports. Hospitalizations — which occurred mainly due to urinary tract infections — were more frequent…

Multivitamins Reduce Fatigue, Improving Quality of Life

Multivitamin supplements reduce fatigue and improve quality of life in people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a new study reports. After 70 days of continuous use, patients taking multivitamin supplements containing vitamins A, B-complex, C, and D improved their blood antioxidant status and experienced up to a 34% reduction…

Isoflavone-rich Diet Boosts Gut Health, Lessening MS Severity

Isoflavone-rich diets boost gut health and lessen multiple sclerosis (MS) severity, a new study in mice suggests. In the study, mice with MS that were fed a diet rich in isoflavone — a plant-based compound — developed diverse and abundant gut bacteria, particularly isoflavone-digesting bacteria, which produced compounds that…

Familial MS Most Common in Children, Women, Warmer Climates

Inherited or familial multiple sclerosis (MS) occurs most frequently in children, women, and people living in warmer climates, a new study suggests. Prevalence rates also differ according to geographical areas, with Canada exhibiting the highest rates and Hungary the lowest. The study, “The global prevalence of familial multiple sclerosis:…

Sleep Deprivation May Worsen Memory in Early MS

Sleep deprivation may worsen memory in people with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a new observational study suggests. A link also was observed between a lack of sleep and worse cognitive efficiency in early MS, but that association was caused by the worse moods…

Raised Serum NfL Levels May Indicate Chronic Active Lesions

Raised serum neurofilament light chain (sNfL) levels may indicate the presence of brain lesions with chronically active inflammation that are linked with more aggressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a new study suggests. People with high sNfL levels, the study revealed, had greater numbers of chronic inflammation lesions and…

MIND Diet May Protect Brain Tissue in MS

A higher adherence to the MIND diet – short for Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension Intervention (DASH) for Neurodegenerative Delay – may protect brain tissue from further damage in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), new research suggests. In particular, consuming more high-fat dairy products was associated with a lower…

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