pediatric-onset MS

Early high-efficacy MS treatment recommended for young patients

High-efficacy therapies given early can significantly reduce the risk of disability worsening in children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis (MS), particularly when treatment is started while patients have fairly minimal disability, according to a new study. While lower-efficacy therapies were also associated with a reduced risk of disability progression…

Ocrevus can be safe, effective for children with active RRMS: Study

Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) is a safe and effective treatment for patients under 18 with highly active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), a small study from Turkey suggests. Over about 2.5 years of the treatment, these pediatric patients experienced no relapses or MRI activity, and their disability level also improved, indicating…

Expert Voices: Understanding pediatric multiple sclerosis research and care

In this installment of our “Expert Voices” series, Multiple Sclerosis News Today asked Tanuja Chitnis, MD, to answer some of your questions about pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS). Chitnis is a board-certified neurologist specializing in multiple sclerosis-related neuroimmunological disorders. Chitnis’s interest in children with MS led her to create…

MS-related Fatigue Strongly Affects Youngsters’ Functioning

Multiple sclerosis and its associated fatigue negatively affect school performance, mental health, and physical and social functioning in children and adolescents with the disease, according to a review study. Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS) also was associated with negative effects on social functioning, mental health, and quality of life in…

Meaningful Cognitive Gains in Pediatric MS Captured Using Pencil-Paper Test

A computer-based training program that exercises distinct components of attention and working memory can improve cognition in young people with pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS), a new study indicates. Findings also support a common pencil-and-paper measure of cognition, called the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), in detecting clinically meaningful changes…

#ACTRIMS2021 – 30 Minutes in Sun Each Day Lowers MS Risk in Children

Editor’s note: The Multiple Sclerosis News Today news team is providing in-depth and unparalleled coverage of the virtual ACTRIMS Forum 2021, Feb. 25–27. Go here to see all the latest stories from the conference. Spending more time in the summer sun and living in generally sunnier places appears to provide protection against…

Pediatric MS Can Be ‘Diagnostic Odyssey’

A post in one of the MS social media groups I follow recently asked whether kids can have MS. The writer was worried about her 3-year-old. One commenter replied that her son was diagnosed when he was 9. But, she wrote, his symptoms actually began to appear when he…

A Pediatric MS Medication Gets the OK

Until about a week ago, no medication was approved in the U.S. to treat patients with pediatric-onset MS (POMS). Now there is one. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given its OK to use Gilenya (fingolimod) to treat relapsing MS in children and adolescents starting at…

#ACTRIMS2017 – Study Reports Possible Link Between Viral Infections, Vitamin D, and Risk for MS

In a U.S. nationwide case study, a team of researchers found evidence for a potential link between viral infections during childhood, vitamin D deficiency, and the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). The study, “Environmental risk factors associated with pediatric MS: The role of remote viral infections and vitamin D revisited,” was recently…

B-cells Differ in Pediatric- and Adult-onset MS, Study Shows

The immune system B-cells responsible for producing antibodies are different in those who develop multiple sclerosis (MS) as children, than in those who develop it as adults, a study shows. The research, “B-cell populations discriminate between pediatric- and adult-onset multiple sclerosis,” was published in the journal Neurology: Neuroimmunology & NeuroInflammation. Because only 3…