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Stem Cell Therapy: Modern Medicine’s Promising Future For MS Treatment

MS research shows that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy may potentially repair the damage and inflammation seen in the nervous system of patients with MS.  During an autoimmune reaction, the myelin sheath coating which is formed around the axons of neurons slowly deteriorates, thus causing physical and cognitive impairments.  By…

Fingolimod (Gilenya) Shown to Benefit Neurons as Well as Immune System

The immune system-suppressing multiple sclerosis (MS) drug fingolimod (Gilenya) also has potentially beneficial effects on the nervous system, according to a recent study, “The multiple sclerosis drug fingolimod (FTY720) stimulates neuronal gene expression, axonal growth and regeneration.“  The article appeared online March 12 in an early version of the journal …

MS Progression Apparently Not Affected by Number of Pregnancies, Study Reports

New long-term research indicates that having multiple children does not lessen or otherwise impact disability in women with multiple sclerosis (MS). The study, titled “Offspring Number Does Not Influence Reaching the Disability’s Milestones in Multiple Sclerosis: A Seven-Year Follow-Up Study,“ was published in The International Journal…

MS Stem Cell Therapies Show Promise, But More Work Is Needed, Researcher Tells ACTRIMS 2016

Dr. Andrew Goodman of the University of Rochester discussed the latest research and perspectives on stem cell strategies for people with multiple sclerosis (MS), saying in a presentation at the Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) Forum 2016 that such therapies, while promising, are not yet ready for widespread clinical use. New therapies…

MS Patients’ Likely Response to Interferon-β May Be Evident in a Blood Biomarker

A new study underscores the variability of immune responses in different people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and suggests this heterogenity affects responses to the commonly prescribed MS medication interferon-β, but blood biomarkers may exist that can help to determine those most likely to benefit from such treatment. The study, “Cytokine profiles…

MS Drug May Prevent Brain Damage in Premature Babies

Premature infants are known to be at risk of cerebral injury due to oxygen deprivation and later problems with cognitive development, but an immunomodulating drug mostly used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) may be of help. Researchers in Germany and Switzerland reported that the drug fingolimod (Gilenya) prevented brain…

Some Forms of MS Might Be Treatable with Hematopoietic Stem Cells

Clinical trials suggest that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), a common treatment for bone marrow and blood cancers, could also help people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The technique involves harvesting new, undeveloped blood or bone marrow (hematopoietic) cells, typically from the person affected with the disease (autologous). The goal is to…

Anti-LINGO-1: All You Need to Know

Recently, Biogen released results from its Phase 2 acute optic neuritis (AON) RENEW trial which tested Anti-LINGO-1. Learn more about this results here. So what is Anti-LINGO-1? According to the MS Society, Anti-LINGO-1 (also known as BIIB033) is a treatment in development by the pharmaceutical company Biogen which is currently…

Multiple Sclerosis Patients Show Improved Reactions with Treadmill Exercise

Several studies have shown that exercise can improve movement in multiple sclerosis (MS), but new research indicates that it specifically may also  improve reaction time, a measurement of cognitive impairment. The study, titled “Acute effects of varying intensities of treadmill walking exercise on inhibitory control in persons with…

Microchips May Be New Standard in Multiple Sclerosis Studies

In a new article published in the journal Trends in Biotechnology, Korean researchers suggest that diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) might be better studied using compact, accessible chip technology than in current methods. The report, titled “Central Nervous System and its Disease…

Neurons in Multiple Sclerosis Patients May be Protected by Vitamin D

A new study from Sweden indicates that vitamin D could help protect nerve cells (neurons) in multiple sclerosis (MS). The report, titled “Vitamin D and axonal injury in multiple sclerosis,“ was published on October 13, 2015, in the Multiple Sclerosis Journal. Scientists have demonstrated, in…

Study Reports No Influence of Vitamin D Supplementation on Inflammation in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

A recent study of people with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) found that high-dose oral vitamin D3 supplementation did not influence markers of inflammation. Inflammation is a reaction to bodily injury that may be over-activated in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The article, titled “Vitamin D supplementation and systemic inflammation in…

#Ocrelizumab – How Ocrelizumab Works

Ocrelizumab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, targets mature B-cells. Almost 95% of the B-cell population has these antigenic epitopes after maturation and does not shed them, which is what makes it a potent marker for therapeutic purposes (cancer being a very common area of interest in this regard). Read more…

Does Sun Exposure in Early Years Delay MS Onset?

Exposure to sunlight may delay the development of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study from researchers in Denmark. The work, titled “Association between age at onset of multiple sclerosis and vitamin D level–related factors,” appeared October 7, 2015 in the journal Neurology.

New Study Unravels How Myelin is Repaired, May Suggest New MS Treatments

Japanese scientists have discovered new information about how the myelin sheath is repaired following damage. Myelin is a fatty substance that wraps around nerve cells and helps them to conduct impulses. The research could have major implications for how multiple sclerosis is understood and even treated. The study, titled “Inactivation…

Biomarkers of Early MS and Overactive Bladder Identified in New Study

Researchers at the University of Athens Medical School in Greece have found that people with early stage multiple sclerosis (MS) and overactive bladder (OAB) have reductions in brain serotonin and a stress-related hormone, cortisol. Serotonin is a chemical that helps nerve cells to communicate. The study, titled “Neurochemical and…

Benefits of Exercise For Kids With MS Touted in New Study

A recent research study focused on whether regular exercise can benefit children with multiple sclerosis (MS). The article appeared in the August 12, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. MS is characterized by inflammation, which manifests as an…

Could Salt Intake be an MS Risk Factor?

Most people know that eating too much salt is bad for your health, but a new study suggests that it could also increase the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). The work appeared in the August 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal, the journal of the Federation of…

New Study Evaluates The Role of MRI in Monitoring MS Progression

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a devastating, progressive disease of the nervous system. It is caused by loss of myelin, a fatty substance that wraps around nerve cells and allows them to conduct impulses and communicate. When myelin is lost, areas of damage called “lesions” result, which appear in the brain and…