cognitive function

ACTRIMS 2024: Progressive MS patients show gains in NG-01 OLE

Repeated treatment with the mesenchymal stem cell therapy NG-01 led to gains in mobility and cognition, along with patient-reported quality of life, for most people with progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) in an extension study. Markers of nerve damage were also reduced, indicating significant nerve-protecting effects. Dimitrios Karussis, MD,…

Rehabilitation in progressive MS found to help cognitive function

Two non-pharmacological rehabilitation approaches — one using a computer program designed to improve working memory and the other involving standardized cognitive-behavioral group sessions — both improved the cognitive function of people with progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a new study reported. While varying medications often are used as…

Bryostatin-1, Molecule to Protect Synapses, May Move Into MS Trials

  Synaptogenix announced plans to advance bryostatin-1, its lead candidate, into clinical trials for multiple sclerosis (MS), marking the third neurological disease the small molecule therapy is being developed to potentially treat. “Multiple sclerosis joins Alzheimer’s disease (“AD”) and Fragile X syndrome as our third indication with potential clinical…

Robotic Exoskeleton Intervention Improves Motor, Cognitive Function

Four weeks of robotic exoskeleton-assisted exercise rehabilitation, called REAER, worked better than conventional gait training in improving mobility and cognitive function in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with substantial walking difficulties, according to a small trial. A robotic exoskeleton consists of an externally worn device that encases a user’s hips, back,…

At-home Brain Stimulation Program Now Available

New York University (NYU) Langone Health has launched an at-home, therapeutic program of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) — a type of non-invasive brain stimulation — to reduce cognitive, motor, speech, or mood symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other brain disorders. A first of its kind, the…

Ampyra Aids More Than Walking in MS, But Side Effects May Be of Concern

Treatment with oral Ampyra (dalfampridine) improves walking ability, finger dexterity, and cognition in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), an analysis of nine randomized clinical trials shows. But the investigators caution the therapy should be taken only under expert medical guidance, due to its higher rate of potential side effects. The…

Cognitive Health Tests Given Online Show ‘Promise’ in Study

Assessing the cognitive health of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) can be performed using online telehealth, with results similar to in-person testing, researchers working with a patient group reported. “By assessing memory in patients prior to a clinic visit using a web-based approach, we may be able to meet the…

Turning Information Overload into a Positive

Books. Magazines. Journals. Emails. Online articles. Newsletters. Podcasts. Local and cable news. The quantity of information we take in daily is impressive — overwhelming, even. According to a 2009 report from researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the average American consumed about 105,000 words per day, or…

MS Patients’ Handwriting Ability Correlates with Movement, Sensory and Cognitive Impairment, Study Shows

A deterioration in multiple sclerosis patients' handwriting aligns with drops in their movement, sensory and cognitive skills, a study reports. MS includes loss of hand dexterity and finger movement control. This affects a patient's capacity to manipulate objects and coordinate hand movement, skills needed in handwriting. Previous studies have shown that MS patients had less handwriting rhythm and control than healthy people. This time researchers decided to compare the handwriting movements of both MS patients and healthy volunteers. The research involved 19 MS patients and 22 healthy age-matched controls. The team asked participants to write a specific sentence on a digitizing tablet. They discovered that the way MS patients wrote was much different than those of the controls. The patients took a lot longer to write each word and to achieve spacing between words. This led to them taking a much longer time overall to write a sentence than healthy people. In addition, analysis of handwriting strokes showed that MS patients' writing wasn't as smooth as that of healthy people. Researchers also found a correlation between patients’ movement abilities and cognitive status on the one hand and their handwriting ability on the other. The team said it believed “these findings might be very useful when planning rehabilitative task-oriented interventions focused on handwriting abilities.” In fact, rehabilitation specialists should consider evaluating “both the motor movement and the cognitive status of PwMS [patients with MS] in order to tailor the intervention."

What is Brain Fog?

Brain fog is one of the most common symptoms of many chronic illnesses, including lupus, multiple sclerosis and fibromyalgia. In this Mind Over Meniere’s video, Glenn describes how brain fog affects him on a daily basis. Discover some Pilates exercises suitable for multiple sclerosis patients.  Brain fog is more…

Computer-assisted Therapy Found to Benefit MS Patients with Cognitive Difficulties

Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who are showing signs of cognitive impairment may benefit from computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation programs, according to a new study. Difficulties with short-term memory, or with processing information and concentrating, are believed to affect 40% to 65% of MS patients. Studies have suggested that cognitive rehabilitation may help, and that computer-assisted therapy used…

Poor Physical and Cognitive Skills in MS Patients Linked to Cerebral Microbleeds

As we age, the risk that small blood vessels will start leaking into brain tissue increases, raising our risk of dementia, stroke, and Parkinson’s disease. New research reveals that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) also have these so-called cerebral microbleeds, and links them to increased physical and cognitive disability. When Robert Zivadinov, a professor of…

Merck Joins with HAPPYneuron to Add Cognitive Training Games to MSdialog

Merck Biopharma  announced it has entered into a partnership with a French subsidiary called HAPPYneuron, and now has an exclusive license to that company’s cognitive remediation training program for multiple sclerosis (MS). The program, a series of brain training games and exercises, will be made available to people needing it through Merck’s MSdialog platform. An e-Health…