walking

Combating Muscle Weakness Associated with MS

Sometimes walking, even with an assistance device, can be very challenging because of the extreme muscle weakness that I experience. The slow, off-balanced gait that has been my constant companion for many years prior to my 2010 multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis is definitely on the decline. Accepting the…

Walk This Way

As I write, I’m pain-free. This is important, but not for the obvious reason. I’m pain-free and can walk — or at least stumble — about as best as I’ve been able to manage of late. It’s not much, but I can be involved in family life and get…

How to Improve MS-Related Imbalance

One of the earliest symptoms that appeared before my multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis was imbalance. I remember turning my head to look at something and feeling slightly off-balance. I didn’t think much of it at the time, but that wobbly sensation gradually increased through the years. Occasionally, I…

New Ocrevus Findings Show Benefits to Range of MS Patients: Interview with Genentech’s Dr. Hideki Garren

Genentech shared new insights into the workings of Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) and its effectiveness in reducing disease activity and slowing progression in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) at the recent 3rd Congress of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN). The new findings, previously reported here, built on analyses of information gathered during the three Phase 3 clinical trials assessing Ocrevus' safety and efficacy, as well as through monitoring patients in extension studies. The studies showed that nearly 40 percent of Ocrevus-treated relapsing patients and nearly 30 percent of primary progressive patients achieved NEPAD during the Phase 3 trials. In contrast, only 21.5 percent of those treated with Rebif and 9.4 percent receiving placebo achieved NEPAD — figures that demonstrate Ocrevus’ impact on patients’ lives, as well as Ocrevus’ ability to slow the decline in walking ability and other types of disabilities are comparable between patients with relapsing and primary progressive disease — data that demonstrate that the treatment acts on disease mechanisms that drive disability in both disease forms. How these effects play out in the long-term is the subject of ongoing research, as Genentech continues to follow these patients in an extension study. In addition, Ocrevus' prescription label strongly advises against pregnancy while on the treatment. Despite precautions, some women became pregnant during the trials. One of the meeting presentations narrated outcomes of these pregnancies; one healthy baby born at term and two ongoing pregnancies in women exposed to the drug. But while Genentech monitors women who become pregnant while on Ocrevus, the number of reported pregnancies is too small to draw conclusions about the treatment’s safety in pregnancy, and researchers do not know if Ocrevus also depletes B-cells in the fetus or in the baby born to a treated woman.

Lipoic Acid, an Over-the-counter Antioxidant, Seen to Slow Brain Atrophy in SPMS Patients

The over-the-counter antioxidant lipoic acid slowed brain deterioration in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), according to a pilot study. An Oregon Health & Science University research team conducted the study, “Lipoic acid in secondary progressive MS.” It was published in the journal Neuroimmunology and Neuroinflammation. A hallmark…

Transcript of Interview on Ampyra Research, MS Walking Ability and Long-Term Use

Multiple Sclerosis News Today interviewed Dr. Linard Filli,
 an MS researcher at the University Hospital Zurich involved in clinical studies of prolonged release Ampyra (dalfampridine), on walking ability in MS patients, and Dr. Andrew Blight, chief scientific officer at Acorda Therapeutics, the treatment’s developer. Here is a full transcript of that interview. An…

#ECTRIMS2016 – MS Patients Achieve Sustained Improvements in Mobility with Ampyra

A recent study showed that the clinical benefits offered by Ampyra (fampridine) in improving mobility among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients has clinical significance. The results were shown in an oral presentation, “Sustained clinically meaningful improvements in walking ability with prolonged-release fampridine: results from the placebo-controlled ENHANCE study,” at the European Committee for…

Resistance Training in Ms Patients Found to Improve Hip Strength, Walking Ability

Researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine released preliminary results of an ongoing study into an effective and progressive resistance training program to improve hip strength and walking ability, areas of concern in neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). The program, consisting of exercises using resistant…